Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)
HOME TEXTS PROJECTS ORDER SITEMAP
ANTHRO CAMPER BUFFON DAUBENTON ROUSSEAU
part 1 part 2 part 3 part 4 part 5
NOTES.
Pag. 38.

(9.) A celebrated Author, by calculating the Goods and the Evils of Human Life and comparing the two Sums, found that the last greatly exceeded the first, and that every thing considered Life to Man was no such valuable Present. I am not surprised at his Conclusions; he drew all his Arguments from the Constitution of Man in a civilized State. Had he looked back to Man in a State of Nature, it is obvious that the Result of his Enquiries would have been very different; that Man would have appeared to him subject to very few Evils but those of his own making, and that he would have acquitted Nature. It has cost us something to make ourselves so miserable. When on the one hand we consider the immense Labours of Mankind, so many Sciences brought to Perfection, so many Arts invented, so many Powers employed, so many Abysses filled up, so many Mountains levelled, so many Rocks rent to Pieces, so many Rivers made navigable, so many Tracts of Land cleared, Lakes emptied, Marshes drained, enormous Buildings raised upon the Earth, and the Sea covered with Ships and Sailors; and on the other weigh with ever so little Attention the real Advantages that have resulted from all these Works to the Human Species; we cannot help being amazed at the vast Disproportion observable between these Things, and deplore the Blindness of Man, which, to feed his foolish Pride and I don't know what vain Self-Admiration, makes him eagerly court and pursue all the Miseries he is capable of feeling, and which beneficent Nature had taken Care to keep at a Distance from him.
     Civilized Man is a mischievous Being; a lamentalbe and constant Experience renders the Proof of it unnecessary; Man, however, is naturally good; I think I have demonstrated it; what then could have depraved him to such a Degree, unless the changes that have happened in his Constitution, his Improvements, and the Lights he has acquired. Let us cry up Human Society as much as we please, it will not be the less true that it necessarily engages Men to hate each in proportion as their Interests clash; to do each other apparent Services, and in fact heap upon each other every imaginable Mischief. What are we to think of a Commerce, in which the Interest of every Individual dictates to him Maxims diametrically opposite to those which the Interest of the Community recommends to the recommends to the Body of Society; a Commerce , in which every Man finds his Account in the Misfortunes of his Neighbour? There is not, perhaps, a single Man in easy Circumstances, whose Death his greedy Heirs, nay and too often his own Children, do not secretly wish for; not a Ship at Sea, the Loss of which would not be an agreeable Piece of News for some Merchant or another; not a House, which a Debtor would not be glad to see reduced to Ashes with all the Papers in it; not a Nation, which does not rejoice at the Misfortunes of its Neighbours. It is thus we find our Advantage in the Disasters of our Fellows, and that the Loss of one Man almost always constitutes the Prosperity of another. But, what is still more dangerous, public Calamities are ever the Objects of the Hopes and Expectations of a Multitude of private Persons. Some are for Sickness, others for Mortality; these for War, those for Famine. I have seen Monsters of Men weep for Grief at the Appearance of a plentiful Season; and the great and fatal Conflagration of London, which cost so many Wretches their Lives or their Fortunes, proved, perhaps, the making of more than Ten Thousand Persons. I know that Montaigne finds fault with Demades the Athenian for having caused a Workman to be punished, who, selling his Coffins very dear, was a great Gainer by the Deaths of his Fellow Citizens: But Montaigne's Reason being, that by the same Rule every Man should be punished, it is plain that it confirms my Argument. Let us therefore look thro' our frivolous Demonstrations of Benevolence at what passes in the inmost Recesses of the Heart, and reflect on what must be that State of Things, in which Men are forced with the same Breath to caress and curse each other, and in which they are born, Enemies by Duty, and Knaves by Interest. Perhaps somebody will object that Society is so formed, that every Man gains by serving the rest. It may be so, but does he not gain still more by injuringk them? There is no lawful Profit but what is greatly exceeded by what may be unlawfully made, and we always gain more by hurting our Neighbours than by doing them good. The only Objection therefore, that now remains, is the Difficulty which Malefactors find in screening themselves from Punishment, and it is to accomplish this, that the Powerful employ all their Strength, and the Weak all their Cunning.
     Savage Man, when he has dined, is at Peace with the whole Creation, and the Friend of all his Fellows. Does a Dispute sometimes happen about a Meal? He seldom comes to Blows without having first compared the Difficulty of conquering with that of finding a Supply in some other Place; and, as Pride has no Share in the Squabble, it ends in a few Cuffs; the Conqueror eats, the Conquered retires to seek his Fortune elsewhere, and all is quiet again. But with Man in society the Case is quite different; in the first place, Necessairies are to be provided, and then Superfluities; Delicacies follow, and then immense Riches, and then Subjects, and then Slaves. He does not enjoy the least Relaxation; what is most extraordinary, the less natural and pressing are his Wants, the more headstrong his Passions become, and what is still worse, the greater is his Power of satisfying them; so that after a long Series of Prosperity, after having swallowed up immense Treasures and ruined Thousands, our Hero closes the Scene by cutting every Throat, 'till he at last finds himself sole Master of an empty Universe. Such is in Miniature the Moral Table, if not of Human Affairs, at least of the secret Pretensions of every civilized Heart.
     Compare without Prejudice the State of the Citizen with that of the Savage, and find out, if you can, how many Inlets, besides his Wickedness, his Wants, his Miseries, the former has opened to Pain and to Death. If you consider the Afflictions of the Mind which prey upon us, the violent Passions which waste and exhaust us, the excessive labours with which the Poor are overburthened, the still more dangerous Indolence, in which the Rich lie sunk, and which bring to the Grave those through Want, and these through Excess. But reflect a Moment on the monstrous Mixture, and pernicious Manner of seasoning so many Kinds of Food, the corrupt State in which they are often made use of; on the Sophistication of Medicines, the Tricks of those who sell them, the Mistakes of those who administer them, the poisonous Qualities of the Vessels in which they are prepared: but think a little seriously on the epidemical Diseases bred by bad Air among great Numbers of Men crowded together, or those occasioned by our delicate Way of living, by our alternate Transitions from the closest Parts of our Houses into the open Air, the taking or laying aside our Cloaths with so little Precaution, and by all those Conveniences which our boundless Sensuality has changed into necessary Habits, and the Neglect or Loss of which afterwards costs us our Life or our Health; set down the Conflagrations and Earthquakes, which devouring or overturning whole Cities destroy the miserable Inhabitants by Thousands; sum up in fine the Dangers with which all these Mischiefs are constantly attended; and then you will see how dearly Nature makes us pay the Contempt we have shewed for her Lessons.
     I shall not now repeat what I have elsewhere said of the Calamities of War; I only wish that Persons sufficiently informed for that Purpose were willing or bold enough to favour us with the Detail of the Villainies committed in Armies by the Undertakers for Victuals and Hospitals; we should then plainly discover that their monstrous Frauds, but too well known already, destroy more Soldiers than actually fall by the Sword of the Enemy, so as often to make the most gallant Armies vanish almost instantaneously from the Face of the Earth. The Number of those who every every Year perish at Sea by Famine, by the Scurvy, by Pirates, by Shipwrecks, would furnish Matter for another very shocking Calculation. Besides it is plain, that we are to place to the account of the Establishment of Property and of Course to that of Society, the Assassinations, Poisonings, Highway Robberies, and even the Punishments inflicted on the Wretches guilty of these Crimes; Punishments, it is true, requisite to prevent greater Evils, but which, by making the Murder of one Man prove the Death of two, double in fact the Loss of the Human Species. How many are the shameful Methods to prevent the Birth of Men, and cheat Nature? Either by those brutal and depraved Appetites which insult her most charming Work, Appetites which neither Savages nor mere Animals were ever acquainted with, and which in civilized Countries could only spring from a corrupt Imagination; or by those secret Abortions, the worthy Fruits of Debauch and vicious Honour; or by the Exposition or Murder of Multitudes of Children, Victims to the Poverty of their Parents, or the barbarous Bashfulness of their Mothers; or in fine by the Mutilation of those Wretches, Part of whose Existence, with that of their whole Posterity, is sacrificed to vain sing-song, or, which is still worse, the brutal Jealousy of some other Men: A Mutilation, which, in the last Case, is doubly outragious to Nature by the Treatment of those who suffer it, and by the Service to which they are condemned. But what if I undertook to shew the Human Species attacked in its very Source, and even in the holiest of all Ties, in forming which Nature is never listened to 'till Fortune has been consulted, and civil Disorder confounding all Virtue and Vice, Continency becomes a criminal Precaution, and a Refusal to give Life to Beings like one's self, an Act of Humanity: but I must not tear open the Veil which hides so many Horrors; it is enough that I have pointed out the Disease, since it is the Business of others to apply a Remedy.
     Let us add to this the great Number of unwholesome Trades which abridge Life, or destroy the Constitution; such as the digging and preparing of Metals and Minerals, especially Lead, Copper, Mercury, Cobalt, Arsenic, Realgar; those other dangerous Trades, which every Day kill so many Men, for Example, Tilers, Carpenters, Masons, and Quarrymen; let us, I say, unite all these Objects, and then we shall discover in the Establishment and Perfection of Societies the Reasons of that Diminution of the Species, which so many Philosophers have taken Notice of.
     Luxury, which nothing can prevent among Men ready to sacrifice every thing to their own Conveniency, and willing to purchase at any Rate the Respect of others, soon puts the finishing Hand to the Evils which Society had begun; and on Pretence of giving Bread to the Poor, which it should rather have avoided making, impoverishes all the rest, and sooner or later dispeoples the State.
     Luxury is a Remedy much worse than the Disease which it pretends to cure; or rather is in itself the worst of all Diseases, both in great and small States. To maintain those Crowds of Servants and Wretches which it never fails to create, it cushes and ruins the laborious Inhabitants of Town and Country: Not unlike those scorching South-Winds, which covering both Trees and Herbs with devouring Insects rob the useful Animals of subsistence, and carry Famine and Death with them where-ever they blow.
     From Society and the Luxury engendered by it, spring the liberal and mechanical Arts, Commerce, Letters, and all those Inutitlities which make Industry flourish, enrich and ruin Nations. The Reasons of such Ruin are very simple. It is plain that Agriculture in its own Nature must be the least lucrative of all Arts, because the Produce of it being of the most indispensable Necessity for all Men, the Price of this Produce must be proportioned to the Faculties of the Poorest. From the same Principle it may be gathered, that in general Arts are lucrative in the inverse Ratio of their Usefulness, and that in the End the most necessary must come to be the most neglected. By which we are taught to form a judgment of the true Advantages of Industry, and of the real Effects of its Progress.
     Such are the evident Causes of all the Miseries into which Opulence at length precipitates the most admired Nations. In proportion as Industry and Arts spread and flourish, the slighted Husbandman, loaded with Taxes necessary for the Support of Luxury, and condemned to spend his Life between Labour and Hunger, leaves his Fields to seek in Town the Bread he should carry there. The more our Capital Cities strike with Admiration the Eyes of the stupid Vulgar; the greater Reason is there to weep, considering what large Tracts of Land are utterly deserted, what fruitful Fields lie uncultivated, how the High-Roads are crowded with unhappy Citizens turned Beggars or Highwaymen, and doomed, sooner or later to lay down their wretched Lives on the Wheel or the Dunghill. It is thus, that while States grow rich on one hand, they grow weak, and are depopulated on the other; and the most powerful Monarchies, after innumerable Labours to enrich and thin themselves, fall at last a Prey to some poor Nation, which has yielded to the fatal Temptation of invading them, and then grows opulent and weak in its turn, 'till it is itself invaded and destroyed by some other.
     I wish somebody would condescend to inform us, what could have produced those Swarms of Barbarians, which during so many Ages overran Europe, Asia, and Africa? Was it to the Industry of their Arts, the Wisdom of their Laws, the Excellence of their Police they owed so prodigious an Increase? I wish our learned Men would be so kind as to tell us, why instead of multiplying to such a Degree, these fierce and brutal Men, without Sense or Science, without Restraint, without Education, did not murder each other every Minute in quarrelling for the spontaneous Productions of their Fields and Woods? Let them tell us how these Wretches could have the Assurance to look in the Face such skilful Men as we were, with so fine a Military Discipline, such excellent Codes, and such wise Laws. Why, in fine, since Society has been perfected in the Northern Climates, and so much Pains have been taken with the Inhabitants of thesee Countries to instruct them in their Duty to one another, and the Art of living peaceably and agreeably together, we no longer see them produce any thing like those numberless Hosts, which they formerly used to send forth. I am afraid that somebody may at last take it into his Head to answer me by saying, that truly all these great Things, namely Arts, Sciences and Laws, were very wisely invented by Men, as a salutary Plague, to prevent the too great Multiplication of Mankind, left this World, given us for our Habitation, should at length be found too little for its Inhabitants.
     What then? Must Societies be destroyed? Meum and Tuum abolished, and Man bury himself again in Forests among Wolves and Bears? A Consequence in the Stile of my Adversaries, which I chuse to obviate rather than permit them the Shame of drawing it. O you, by whom the Voice of Heaven has not been heard, and who allow your Species no other Lot but that of finishing in Peace this short Life; you, who can lay down in the midst of Cities your fatal Acquisitions, your turbulent Spirits, your corrupted Hearts and boundless Desires, take up again, since it is in your Power, your ancient and primitive Innocence; retire to the Woods, there to lose the Sight and Remembrance of the Crimes committed by your Cotemporaries; nor be afraid of debasing your Species, by renouncing its Improvements in order to renounce its Vices. As to Men like me, whose Passions have irretrievably destroyed their original Simplicity, who can no longer live upon Grass and Acorns, or without Laws and Magistrates; all those who were honoured in the Person of their first Parent with supernatural Lessons; those, who discover, in the Intention to give immediately to Human Actions a Morality which otherwise they must have been so long in acquiring, the Reason of a Precept indifferent in itself, and utterly inexplicable in every other System; those, in a word, who are convinced that the Divine Voice has called all Men to the Perfection and Happiness of the celestrial Intelligences; all such will endeavour, by the Practice of those Virtues to which they oblige themselves in learning to distinguish them, to deserve the eternal Reward promised to their Obedience. They will respect the sacred Bonds of those Societies to which they belong; they will love their Fellows, and will serve them to the utmost of their Power; they will religiously obey the Laws, and all those who make or administer them; they will above all Things honour those good and wise Princes, who find out Means to prevent, cure, or even palliate the Crowd of Evils and Abuses always ready to overwhelm us; they will animate the Zeal of those worthy Chiefs, by shewing them without Fear or Flattery the Importance of their Task, and the Rigour of their Duties. But after all they must despise a Constitution, which cannot subsist without the Assistance of so many Men of Worth, who are oftener wanted than found; and from which, in Spite of all their Cares, there always spring more real Calamities than apparent Advantages.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 9) Un auteur célèbre, calculant les biens et les maux de la vie humaine et comparant les deux sommes, a trouvé que la dernière surpassait l'autre de beaucoup et qu'à tout prendre la vie était pour l'homme un assez mauvais présent. Je ne suis point surpris de sa conclusion; il a tiré tous ses raisonnements de la constitution de l'homme civil: s'il fût remonté jusqu'à l'homme naturel, on peut juger qu'il eût trouvé des résultats très différents, qu'il eût aperçu que l'homme n'a guère de maux que ceux qu'il s'est donnés lui-même et que la nature eût été justifiée. Ce n'est pas sans peine que nous sommes parvenus à nous rendre si malheureux. Quand d'un coté l'on considère les immenses travaux des hommes, tant de sciences approfondies, tant d'arts inventés, tant de forces employées, des abîmes comblés, des montagnes rasées, des rochers brisés, des fleuves rendus navigables, des terres défrichées, des lacs creusés, des marais desséchés, des bâtiments énormes élevés sur la terre, la mer couverte de vaisseaux et de matelots, et que de l'autre on recherche avec un peu de méditation les vrais avantages qui ont résulté de tout cela pour le bonheur de l'espèce humaine, on ne peut qu'être frappé de l'étonnante disproportion qui règne entre ces choses, et déplorer l'aveuglement de l'homme qui, pour nourrir son fol orgueil et je ne sais quelle vaine admiration de lui-même, le fait courir avec ardeur après toutes les misères dont il est susceptible, et que la bienfaisante nature avait pris soin d'écarter de lui.
     Les hommes sont méchants; une triste et continuelle expérience dispense de la preuve; cependant l'homme est naturellement bon, je crois l'avoir démontré; qu'est-ce donc qui peut l'avoir dépravé à ce point sinon les changements survenus dans sa constitution, les progrès qu'il a faits et les connaissances qu'il a acquises? Qu'on admire tant qu'on voudra la société humaine, il n'en sera pas moins vrai qu'elle porte nécessairement les hommes à s'entre-haïr à proportion que leurs intérêts se croisent, à se rendre mutuellement des services apparents et à se faire en effet tous les maux imaginables. Que peut-on penser d'un commerce où la raison de chaque particulier lui dicte des maximes directement contraires à celles que la raison publique prêche au corps de la société et où chacun trouve son compte dans le malheur d'autrui? Il n'y a peut-être pas un homme aisé à qui des héritiers avides et souvent ses propres enfants ne souhaitent la mort en secret, pas un vaisseau en mer dont le naufrage ne fût une bonne nouvelle pour quelque négociant, pas une maison qu'un débiteur ne voulût voir brûler avec tous les papiers qu'elle contient; pas un peuple qui ne se réjouisse des désastres de ses voisins. C'est ainsi que nous trouvons notre avantage dans le préjudice de nos semblables, et que la perte de l'un fait presque toujours la prospérité de l'autre, mais ce qu'il y de plus dangereux encore, c'est que les calamités publiques sont l'attente et l'espoir d'une multitude de particuliers. Les uns veulent des maladies, d'autres la moralité, d'autres la guerre, d'autres la famine; j'ai vu des hommes affreux pleurer de douleur aux apparences d'une année fertile, et le grand et funeste incendie de Londres, qui coûta la vie ou les biens à tant de malheureux, fit peut-être la fortune à plus de dix mille personnes. Je sais que Montaigne blâme l'Athénien Démades d'avoir fait punir un ouvrier qui vendant fort cher des cercueils gagnait beaucoup à la mort des citoyens, mais la raison que Montaigne allègue étant qu'il faudrait punir tout le monde, il est évident qu'elle confirme les miennes. Qu'on pénètre donc au travers de nos frivoles démonstrations de bienveillance ce qui se passe au fond des coeurs et qu'on réfléchisse à ce que doit être un état de choses où tous les hommes sont forcés de se caresser et de se détruire mutuellement et où ils naissent ennemis par devoir et fourbes par intérêt. Si l'on me répond que la société est tellement constituée que chaque homme gagne à servir les autres, je répliquerai que cela serait fort bien s'il ne gagnait encore plus à leur nuire. Il n'y a point de profit si légitime qui ne soit surpassé par celui qu'on peut faire illégitimement et le tort fait au prochain est toujours plus lucratif que les services. Il ne s'agit donc plus que de trouver les moyens de s'assurer l'impunité, et c'est à quoi les puissants emploient toutes leurs forces, et les faibles toutes leurs ruses.
     L'homme sauvage, quand il a dîné, est en paix avec toute la nature, et l'ami de tous ses semblables. S'agit-il quelquefois de disputer son repas? Il n'en vient jamais aux coups sans avoir auparavant comparé la difficulté de vaincre avec celle de trouver ailleurs sa subsistance et comme l'orgueil ne se mêle pas du combat, il se termine par quelques coups de poing. Le vainqueur mange, le vaincu va chercher fortune, et tout est pacifié, mais chez l'homme en société, ce sont bien d'autres affaires; il s'agit premièrement de pourvoir au nécessaire, et puis au superflu; ensuite viennent les délices, et puis les immenses richesses, et puis des sujets, et puis des esclaves; il n'a pas un moment de relâche; ce qu'il y a de plus singulier, c'est que moins les besoins sont naturels et pressants, plus les passions augmentent, et, qui pis est, le pouvoir de les satisfaire; de sorte qu'après de longues prospérités, après avoir englouti bien des trésors et désolé bien des hommes, mon héros finira par tout égorger jusqu'à ce qu'il soit l'unique maître de l'univers. Tel est en abrégé le tableau moral, sinon de la vie humaine, au moins des prétentions secrètes du coeur de tout homme civilisé.
     Comparez sans préjugés l'état de l'homme civil avec celui de l'homme sauvage et recherchez, si vous le pouvez, combien, outre sa méchanceté, ses besoins et ses misères, le premier a ouvert de nouvelles portes à la douleur à la mort. Si vous considérez les peines d'esprit qui nous consument, les passions violentes qui nous épuisent et nous désolent, les travaux excessifs dont les pauvres sont surchargés, la mollesse encore plus dangereuse à laquelle les riches s'abandonnent, et qui font mourir les uns de leurs besoins et les autres de leurs excès, si vous songez aux monstrueux mélanges des aliments, à leurs pernicieux assaisonnements, aux denrées corrompues, aux drogues falsifiées, aux friponneries de ceux qui les vendent, aux erreurs de ceux qui les administrent, au poison des vaisseaux dans lesquels on les prépare, si vous faites attention aux maladies épidémiques engendrées par le mauvais air parmi des multitudes d'hommes rassemblés, à celles qu'occasionnent la délicatesse de notre manière de vivre, les passages alternatifs de l'intérieur de nos maisons au grand air, l'usage des habillements pris ou quittés avec trop peu de précaution, et tous les soins que notre sensualité excessive a tournés en habitudes nécessaires et dont la négligence ou la privation nous coûte ensuite la vie ou la santé, si vous mettez en ligne de compte les incendies et les tremblements de terre qui, consumant ou renversant des villes entières, en font périr les habitants par milliers, en un mot, si vous réunissez les dangers que toutes ces causes assemblent continuellement sur nos têtes, vous sentirez combien la nature nous fait payer cher le mépris que nous avons fait de ses leçons.
     Je ne répéterai point ici sur la guerre ce que j'en ai dit ailleurs; mais je voudrais que les gens instruits voulussent ou osassent donner une fois au public le détail des horreurs qui se commettent dans les armées par les entrepreneurs des vivres et des hôpitaux, on verrait que leurs manoeuvres non trop secrètes par lesquelles les plus brillantes armées se fondent en moins de rien font plus périr de soldats que n'en moissonne le fer ennemi. C'est encore un calcul non moins étonnant que celui des hommes que la mer engloutit tous les ans, soit par la faim, soit par le scorbut, soit par les pirates, soit par le feu, soit par les naufrages. Il est clair qu'il faut mettre aussi sur le compte de la propriété établie, et par conséquent de la société, les assassinats, les empoisonnements, les vols de grands chemins et les punitions mêmes de ces crimes, punitions nécessaires pour prévenir de plus grands maux, mais qui, pour le meurtre d'un homme coûtant la vie à deux ou davantage, ne laissent pas de doubler réellement la perte de l'espèce humaine. Combien de moyens honteux d'empêcher la naissance des hommes et de tromper la nature? Soit par ces goûts brutaux et dépravés qui insultent son plus charmant ouvrage, goûts que les sauvages ni les animaux ne connurent jamais, et qui ne sont nés dans les pays policés que d'une imagination corrompue; soit par ces avortements secrets, dignes fruits de la débauche et de l'honneur vicieux; soit par l'exposition ou le meurtre d'une multitude d'enfants, victimes de la misère de leurs parents ou de la honte barbare de leurs mères; soit enfin par la mutilation de ces malheureux dont une partie de l'existence et toute la postérité sont sacrifiées à de vaines chansons, ou, ce qui est pis encore, à la brutale jalousie de quelques hommes, mutilation qui dans ce dernier cas outrage doublement la nature, et par le traitement que reçoivent ceux qui la souffrent, et par l'usage auquel ils sont destinés. Que serait-ce si j'entreprenais de montrer l'espèce humaine attaquée dans sa source même, et jusque dans le plus saint de tous les liens, où l'on n'ose plus écouter la nature qu'après avoir consulté la fortune et où, le désordre civil confondant les vertus et les vices, la continence devient une précaution criminelle, et le refus de donner la vie à son semblable,un acte d'humanité? Mais sans déchirer le voile qui couvre tant d'horreurs, contentons-nous d'indiquer le mal auquel d'autres doivent apporter le remède.
     Qu'on ajoute à tout cela cette quantité de métiers malsains qui abrègent les jours ou détruisent le tempérament; tels que sont les travaux des mines, les diverses préparations des métaux, des minéraux, surtout du plomb, du cuivre, du mercure, du cobalt, de l'arsenic, du réalgar; ces autres métiers périlleux qui coûtent tous les jours la vie à quantité d'ouvriers, les uns couvreurs, d'autres charpentiers, d'autres maçons, d'autres travaillant aux carrières; qu'on réunisse, dis-je, tous ces objets, et l'on pourra voir dans l'établissement et la perfection des sociétés les raisons de la diminution de l'espèce, observée par plus d'un philosophe.
     Le luxe, impossible à prévenir chez des hommes avides de leurs propres commodités et de la considération des autres, achève bientôt le mal que les sociétés ont commencé, et sous prétexte de faire vivre les pauvres qu'il n'eût pas fallu faire, il appauvrit tout le reste et dépeuple l'Etat tôt ou tard.
     Le luxe est un remède beaucoup pire que le mal qu'il prétend guérir; ou plutôt, il est lui-même le pire de tous les maux, dans quelque Etat grand ou petit que ce puisse être, et qui, pour nourrir des foules de valets et de misérables qu'il a faits, accable et ruine le laboureur et le citoyen. Semblable à ces vents brûlants du midi qui, couvrant l'herbe et la verdure d'insectes dévorants, ôtent la subsistance aux animaux utiles et portent la disette et la mort dans tous les lieux où ils se font sentir.
     De la société et du luxe qu'elle engendre, naissent les arts libéraux et mécaniques, le commerce, les lettres; et toutes ces inutilités, qui font fleurir l'industrie, enrichissent et perdent les Etats. La raison de ce dépérissement est très simple. Il est aisé de voir que par sa nature l'agriculture doit être le moins lucratif de tous les arts; parce que son produit étant de l'usage le plus indispensable pour tous les hommes, le prix en doit être proportionné aux facultés des plus pauvres. Du même principe on peut tirer cette règle, qu'en général les arts sont lucratifs en raison inverse de leur utilité et que les plus nécessaires doivent enfin devenir les plus négligés. Par où l'on voit ce qu'il faut penser des vrais avantages de l'industrie et de l'effet réel qui résulte de ses progrès.
     Telles sont les causes sensibles de toutes les misères où l'opulence précipite enfin les nations les plus admirées. A mesure que l'industrie et les arts s'étendent et fleurissent, le cultivateur, méprisé, chargé d'impôts nécessaires à l'entretien du luxe et condamné à passer sa vie entre le travail et la faim, abandonne ses champs, pour aller chercher dans les villes le pain qu'il y devrait porter. Plus les capitales frappent d'admiration les yeux stupides du peuple, plus il faudrait gémir de voir les campagnes abandonnées, les terres en friche, et les grands chemins inondés de malheureux citoyens devenus mendiants ou voleurs et destinés à finir un jour leur misère sur la roue ou sur un fumier. C'est ainsi que l'Etat, s'enrichissant d'un côté, s'affaiblit et se dépeuple de l'autre, et que les plus puissantes monarchies, après bien des travaux pour se rendre opulentes et désertes, finissent par devenir la proie des nations pauvres qui succombent à la funeste tentation de les envahir, et qui s'enrichissent et s'affaiblissent à leur tour, jusqu'à ce qu'elles soient elles-mêmes envahies et détruites par d'autres.
     Qu'on daigne nous expliquer une fois ce qui avait pu produire ces nuées de barbares qui durant tant de siècles ont inondé l'Europe, l'Asie et l'Afrique? Etait-ce à l'industrie de leurs arts, à la sagesse de leurs lois, à l'excellence de leur police, qu'ils devaient cette prodigieuse population? Que nos savants veuillent bien nous dire pourquoi, loin de multiplier à ce point, ces hommes féroces et brutaux, sans lumières, sans frein, sans éducation, ne s'entr'égorgeaient pas tous à chaque instant, pour se disputer leur pâture ou leur chasse? Qu'ils nous expliquent comment ces misérables ont eu seulement la hardiesse de regarder en face de si habiles gens que nous étions, avec une si belle discipline militaire, de si beaux codes, et de si sages lois? Enfin, pourquoi, depuis que la société s'est perfectionnée dans les pays du Nord et qu'on y a tant pris de peine pour appendre aux hommes leurs devoirs mutuels et l'art de vivre agréablement et paisiblement ensemble, on n'en voit plus rien sortir de semblable à ces multitudes d'hommes qu'il produisait autrefois? J'ai bien peur que quelqu'un ne s'avise à la fin de me répondre que toutes ces grandes choses, savoir les arts, les sciences et les lois, ont été très sagement inventées par les hommes, comme une peste salutaire pour prévenir l'excessive multiplication de l'espèce, de peur que ce monde, qui nous est destiné, ne devînt à la fin trop petit pour ses habitants.
     Quoi donc? Faut-il détruire les sociétés, anéantir le tien et le mien, et retourner vivre dans les forêts avec les ours? Conséquence à la manière de mes adversaires, que j'aime autant prévenir que de leur laisser la honte de la tirer. O vous, à qui la voix céleste ne s'est point fait entendre et qui ne reconnaissez pour votre espèce d'autre destination que d'achever en paix cette courte vie, vous qui pouvez laisser au milieu des villes vos funestes acquisitions, vos esprits inquiets, vos coeurs corrompus et vos désirs effrénés, reprenez, puisqu'il dépend de vous, votre antique et première innocence; allez dans les bois perdre la vue et la mémoire des crimes de vos contemporains et ne craignez point d'avilir votre espèce, en renonçant à ses lumières pour renoncer à ses vices. Quant aux hommes semblables à moi dont les passions ont détruit pour toujours l'originelle simplicité, qui ne peuvent plus se nourrir d'herbe et de gland, ni se passer de lois et de chefs, ceux qui furent honorés dans leur premier père de leçons surnaturelles, ceux qui verront dans l'intention de donner d'abord aux actions humaines une moralité qu'elles n'eussent de longtemps acquise, la raison d'un précepte indifférent par lui-même et inexplicable dans tout autre système; ceux, en un mot, qui sont convaincus que la voix divine appela tout le genre humain aux lumières et au bonheur des célestes intelligences, tout ceux-là tâcheront, par l'exercice des vertus qu'ils s'obligent à pratiquer en apprenant à les connaître, à mériter le prix éternel qu'ils en doivent attendre; ils respecteront les sacrés liens des sociétés dont ils sont les membres; ils aimeront leurs semblables et les serviront de tout leur pouvoir; ils obéiront scrupuleusement aux lois et aux hommes qui en sont les auteurs et les ministres, ils honoreront surtout les bons et sages princes qui sauront prévenir, guérir ou pallier cette foule d'abus et de maux toujours prêts à nous accabler, ils animeront le zèle de ces dignes chefs, en leur montrant sans crainte et sans flatterie la grandeur de leur tâche et la rigueur de leur devoir; mais ils n'en mépriseront pas moins une constitution qui ne peut se maintenir qu'à l'aide de tant de gens respectables qu'on désire plus souvent qu'on ne les obtient et de laquelle, malgré tous leurs soins, naissent toujours plus de calamités réelles que d'avantages apparents.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 39.

(10.) Among the Men we are ourselves acquainted with, or know by History, or the Relations of Travellers; some are black, some white, and some red; some wear their Hair long, some instead of Hair have nothing but a curled Wool; some are in a Manner covered all over with Hair, others have not so much as a Beard; there have been, and perhaps there are still Nations of a gigantic Size; not to insist on the Fable of the Pigmies, which perhaps is no more an Exaggeration, it is well known that the Laplanders, and especially the Greenlanders, are greatly below the middle Stature; it is even pretended that there are whole Nations with Tails like Quadrupeds; and without blindly giving Credit to Herodotus and Ctesias, we may at least draw this very probably Opinion from their Relations, that if good Observations could have been made in these early Times, when the Manners and Customs of Nations differed more than they do at present, more striking Varieties would have likewise appeared in the Figure and Habit of their Bodies. All these Facts, of which incontestible Proofs may be easily given, can astonish those only who never consider any Objects but such as surround them, and are Strangers to the powerful Influence of different Modes of Life, Climate, Air, Food, and above all the surprizing Power of the same Causes, when acting continually on a long Succession of Generations. At present, that the Nations scattered over the Face of the Earth are better united by Trade, Travelling, and Conquest, and their Manners and Customs grow every Day more and more like each other in Consequence of a more frequent Intercourse, certain national Differences are greatly diminished. For Example, it is plain that the French are no longer those large, fair haired and fair skinned Bodies described by Latin Historians, though Time, assisted by the Mixture of Franks and Normans equally fair, should, one would imagine, have restored what the Climate, by the frequent Visits of the Romans, might have lost of its Influence over the natural Constitution and Complextion of the Inhabitants. All these Observations on the Varieties, which a thousand Causes can produce and have in fact produced in the Human Species, make me doubt if several Animals, which Travellers have taken for Beasts, for Want of examining them properly, on account of some Difference they observed in their exterior Configuration, or merely because these Animals did not speak, were not in fact true Men, (though in a savage State,) whose Race early dispersed in the Woods never had any Opportunity of developing its virtual Faculties, and had acquired no Degree of Perfection, but still remained in the primitive State of Nature. I shall give an Example to illustrate my Meaning.
     "There are found, says the Translator of the History of Voyages, &c. in the Kingdom of Congo, a great many of those large Animals, called Orang-Outang, in the East Indies, which form a kind of mean Rank of Beings between Men and Baboons. Battel tells us, that in the Forests of Mayomba in the Kingdom of Loango, there are two Sorts of Monsters, the largest of which are called Pongos, and the others Enjokos. The first exactly resemble Man, but are much larger and taller. Their Face is a Human one, but with very hollow Eyes. Their Hands, their Cheeks. their Ears are quite bare of Hair, all to their Eye-Brows, which are very long. The rest of their Bodies is pretty hairy, and the Hair is of a brown Colour. In short, the only thing by which they can be distinguished from the Human Species, is the Make of their Legs, which has no Calf. They walk upright, holding in their Hands the Hair of their Neck. They keep in the Woods; they sleep in Trees, where they make a kind of Roof that screens them from the Rain. They never touch the Flesh of Animals, but live upon Nuts or other wild Fruits. The Negroes, with whom it is customary, when their Way lies through Forests, to light Fires in the Night Time, observe, that as soon as they set out in the Morning, the Pongos gather about the Fire, and continue there 'till it goes out: for though these Animals are very dexterous, they have not Sense enough to keep up the Fire by supplying it with Fuel.
     They sometimes march in great Companies, and kill the Negroes who happen to be crossing the Forests. They even fall upon the Elephants who come to feed in the Places they haunt, and belabour these Animals so much with their naked Fists or with Sticks, that they make them roar out again, and fly to avoid their fury. The Pongos, when grown up, are never taken alive, for they are then so strong, that ten Men would not be able to master one of them. But the Negroes take several of the young ones after killing the Mother, from whose Body, they cling so fast to it, it is no easy Matter to part them. When one of these Animals dies, the rest cover his Body with a Heap of Leaves or Branches. Purchass adds, that in his Conferences with Battel he had been informed by himself that a Pongo one Day carried off from him a little Negroes, who spent a whole Month among these Animals; for they do no Harm to the Men they surprize, provided their Captives do not look at them, as the little Negroe observed. Battel has not described the second Species of Monster.
     Dapper confirms that the Kingdom of Congo is full of these Animals, which in the East Indies are known by the Name of Orang-Outang, that is to say, Inhabitants of the Woods, and which the Africans call Quojas-Morros. This Beast, he says, is so like a Man, that some Travellers have been silly enough to think it might be the Offspring of a Woman and a Monkey: a Chimera which the Negroes themselves laught at. One of these Animals was brought from Congo to Holland, and presented to Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. It was as tall as a Child of three Years, moderately corpulent, and though square-built was well-proportioned, and withal very active and lively; its Legs were strong and fleshy, the Back-part of the Body covered all over with black Hair, the Fore-part without any Hair at all. At first Sight its Face looked like that of a Man, but the Nose was flat and turned up; its Ears too resembled those of the Human Species; its Bosom, for it was a Female, was dimpled; its Navel sunk in, its Shoulders well hung, its Hands divided into Fingers and Thumbs, the Calfs of its Legs and its Heels fat and fleshy. She often walked upright on her Legs, and could raise and carry pretty heavy Burthens. When she wanted to drink, she took hold of the Lid of the Vessel with one Hand, and of the Bottom with the other, and after drinking wiped her Lips very prettily. When she laid herself down to rest, she placed her Head upon a Pillow; and covered herself with so much Dexterity, that one would have taken her for a Woman in Bed. The Negroes tell strange Stories of this Animal. They assure us that the Male not only ravishes grown up Women and young Girls, but even is not afraid to attack armed Men; in a word, there is great Reason to think that this is the Satyr of the Ancients. They are, perhaps, the Animals meant by Merolla, where he says that the Negroes, when hunting, sometimes catch wild Men and Women."
     Mention is likewise made in the third Tome of the same History of Voyages of these kind of antropoform Animals, by the Name of Beggos and Mandrills; but to abide by the preceding Relations, there are in the Description of these pretended Monsters very striking Conformities with the Human Species, and smaller Differences than may be pointed out between one Man and another. We cannot discover by these Passages, what Reasons the Writers had for refusing to the Animals in question the Name of wild Men; but we may easily guess, that it was on account of their Stupidity and Want of Speech; weak Arguments for those who know, that, though the Organs of Speech are natural to Man, it is otherwise with Speech itself, and are aware to what a Pitch the Perfectibility of the Human Species may have exalted civil Man above his original Condition. The small Number of Lines bestowed upon these Descriptions is sufficient to shew with what Prejudice these Animals have been seen, and how slightly they have been examined. For Example, they are represented as Monsters, and at the same Time allowed to engender. In one Place Battel says, "the Pongos kill the Negroes they meet with in the Woods;" in another Purchass adds, "they do them no Harm, even when they surprize them, provided the Negroes take Care not to look too attentively at them. The Pongos gather about the Fires lighted by the Negroes, when these have left it, and withdraw themselves in their Turn, as soon as the Fire goes out." Such is the Fact, now for the Comment upon it; "for with all their Address they have not Sense enough to keep the Fire in by supplying it with Wood." I should be glad to know by what Means Battel, or his Compiler Purchass, found out, that the Retreat of the Pongos was the Effect of Stupidity in them rather than Inclination. In a Climate like Loango, Animals cannot stand much in need of Fire, and if the Negroes make Fires, it is not so much to warm themselves as to scare and kept at a Distance the wild Beasts with which the Country swarms; it is therefore but natural that the Pongos, after having amused themselves for some Time with the Blaze, or sufficiently warmed themselves, should grow tired of standing stock still in the same Place, and return to their wild Fruits which require more Time than the Flesh of Animals. Besides it is well known that most Animals, and Man himself, are naturally indolent, and never care to trouble themselves about any thing they can any way do without. In fine, it appears very strange that the Pongos, whose Dexterity and Strength is so much cried up, who know how to bury their Dead, and make themselves Awnings with Leaves and Branches, should not know how to keep up a Wood Fire by pushing the half-burnt Sticks into it. I remember to have seen a Monkey do the very thing which Battel and Purchass will not allow the Pongos Sense to do; it is true that, my Thoughts not having as yet taken a Turn this Way, I committed myself the very Fault with which I now reproach our Travellers, and neglected examining if the Monkey's Intention was to keep in the Fire, or barely to imitate those whom he had seen doing it. Be that as it will, it is evident that the Monkey does not belong to the Human Species, not only because he wants the Faculty of Speech, but above all because his Species has not the Faculty of improving, which is the specifick Characteristic of the Human Species. But it does not appear that the same Experiments have been made with the Pongos and the Orang-Outang carefully enough to afford the same Conclusion. There is however a Method by which, if the Orang-Outang or such other Animals were of the Human Species, the most illiterate Observers might make themselves sure of it; but besides that a single Generation would not be sufficient for such an Experiment; it must be considered as impracticable, because it is necessary that what is now no more than a Supposition should be proved a Fact, before the Experiment requisite to ascertain the Reality of it could be innocently made.
     Hasty Conclusions, and such as are not the Fruits of a well-enlightened Reason, are apt to run to great Lengths. Our Voyagers make Beasts under the Name of Pongos, Mandrills, and Orang-Outang, of the very Beings, which the Antients exalted into Divinities under the Name of Satyrs, Fauns, and Sylvans. Perhaps more exact Enquiries will shew them to be Men. In the mean time, it appears to me as reasonable to abide by the Account of Merolla, a learned Religious, and ocular Witness, and who with all his Candour was a Man of Genius, as by that of Battel a mere Merchant, or those of Dapper, Purchass, and other mere Compilers.
     What are we to think such Observers would have said of the Child found in 1699, which I have already mentioned; he did not shew the least Signs of Reason, walked upon all Fours, had no Speech, and formed Sounds which resembled in nothing those of a Man. He was for a long Time, continues the Philosopher from whom I have this Fact, without being able to utter even a few Words, and what he did utter, was in a barbarous Manner. As soon as he could speak, he was questioned concerning his first Condition, but he no more remembered an thing of it, than we do of what happened to us in the Cradle. Had the Child had the Misfortune of falling into the Hands of our Travellers, they would certainly on account of his Silence and his Stupidity have turned him loose into the Woods again, or shut him up in a Monastery; and then have published very learned Relations of him, as of a very curious Beast, and not very unlike a Man.
      Though the Inhabitants of Europe for three or four Hundred Years past have overrun the other Parts of the World, and are constantly publishing new Collections of Voyages, I am persuaded that those of Europe are the only Men we are as yet acquainted with; nay, to judge by the ridiculous Prejudices which to this Day prevail even among Men of Letters, very few, by the pompous Title of the Study of Mankind, mean any thing more than the Study of their own Countrymen. Individuals may go and come as much as they please, Philosophy, one would imagine, remained stock still; and accordingly that of one Nation little suits another. The Reason of this is evident, at least in respect to distant Countries. There are but four Sorts of Persons, who make long Voyages; Sailors, Merchants, Soldiers, and Missionaries: Now it is scarce to be expected that the three first Sorts should make good Observers; and as to those of the last, though they were not like the rest, liable to Prejudices of Profession, we may conclude that they are too much taken up with the Duties of their sublime Vocation, to descend to Researches which seem to be merely curious, and which would interfere with the more important Labours to which they devote themselves. Besides, to preach the Gospel with Success, Zeal alone is sufficient, God gives the rest; but to study Men, Talents are requisite which God has not engaged to give any Man, and which do not always fall to the Share of Saints. We cannot open a Book of Voyages without falling upon Descriptions of characters and Manners; but it must appear very surprizing that these Travellers, who have described so many things, say nothing that every Reader was not already very well acquainted with; and had not Sense enough to observe at the other End of the Globe more than what they might have easily seen without stirring out of their own Street; and that those real Features which distinguish Nations, and strike every ? Eye, have almost always escaped theirs. Hence that fine Adage, so thread-worn by the Philosophers, that Men are in all Countries the same; that, as they have every where the same Passions and the same Vices, it is almost useless to endeavour to characterise the different Nations which inhabit the Earth; a way of arguing little better, in a manner, than that which should make us conclude, that it is impossible to distinguish between Peter and James, because they have both a Mouth, a Nose, and a Pair of Eyes.
     Shall we never again behold those happy Days, in which the common People did not intermeddle with Philosophy, but the Platos, the Thaleses, and the Pythogorases, thirsting after Knowledge, undertook the longest Voyages merely to gain Instruction, and visited the remotest Corners of the Earth to shake off the Yoke of national Prejudice, to learn to distinguish Men by the real Conformity and Difference between them, and acquire that universal Insight into Nature, which does not belong to one Age or one Country exclusive of others, but being coexistent with every Time and Place composes, as it were, the common Science of all wise Men?
     We admire the Magnificence of some curious Persons, who at a great Expence have travelled themselves, or sent others to the East with learned Men and Painters, to take Drawings of Ruins, or decypher Inscriptions: But I am amazed that in an Age, in which Men so much affect useful and polite Learning, there does not start up two Men perfectly united, and rich, one in Money, the other in Genius, both Lovers of Glory, and studious of Immortality, one of whom should be willing to sacrifice twenty thousand Crowns of his Fortune, and the other ten Years of his Life to make such a serious Voyage round the World, as would recommend their Names to the present and future Generations; not to confine themselves to Plants and Stones, but for once study Men and Manners; and who, after so many Ages spent in measuring and surveying th House, should at last take it into their Heads to make themselves acquainted with the Inhabitants.
     The Academicians, who visited the Northern Parts of Europe and the Equatorial Parts of America, did it more in Quality of Geometricians than Philosophers. However, as they were at once both Geometricians and Philosophers, we cannot consider as altogether unknown those Regions which have been seen and described by a Condamine and a Maupertuis. The Jeweller Chardin, who travelled like Plato, has left nothing unsaid concerning Persia; China seems to have been well surveyed by the Jesuits. Kempfer gives a tolerable Idea of the little he saw in Japan. Except what these Relations tell us, we know nothing of the Inhabitants of the East Indies, frequented merely by Europeans more intent upon filling their Pockets with Money than their Heads with useful Knowledge. All Africa and its numerous Inhabitants, equally singular in Point of Character and Colour, still remain unexamined; the whole Earth is covered with Nations of which we know nothing but the Names; and yet we set up for Judge of Mankind! Suppose a Montesquieu, a Buffon, a Diderot, a Duclos, a d'Alembert, a Condillac, or Men of that Stamp, engaged in a Voyage for the Instruction of their Countrymen, observing and describing with all that Attention and Exactness they are Masters of Turkey, Egypt, Barbary, the Empire of Morocco, Guinea, the Land of the Caffres, the interior Parts and eastern Shores of Africa, Malabar, the Mogul's Country, the Banks of the Ganges, the Kingdoms of Siam, Pegu and Ava, China, Tartary, and above all Japan; then in the other Hemisphere, Mexico, Peru, Chili, Terra Magellanica, not forgetting the real or imaginary Patagons, Tucuman, Paraguay if possible, Brazil, in fine the Carribee Islands, Florica, and all the Savage Countries, the most important Part of the Whole Circuit, and that which would require the greatest Care and Attention; let us suppose that these new Herculeses, at their Return from these memorable Expeditions, sat down to compose at their Leisure a natural, moral, and political History of what they had seen; we should ourselves see a new World issue from their Pens, and should thus learn to judge of our own: I say that when such Observers affirmed of one Animal, that it was a Man, and of another that it was a Beast, we might take their Word for it; but it would be the Height of Simplicity to trust in these Matters to illiterate Travellers, concerning whom one would sometimes be apt to start the very Doubt, which they take upon them to resolve concerning other Animals.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 10) Parmi les hommes que nous connaissons, ou par nous-mêmes, ou par les historiens, ou par les voyageurs, les uns sont noirs, les autres blancs, les autres rouges; les uns portent de longs cheveux, les autres n'ont que de la laine frisée; les uns sont presque tout velus, les autres n'ont pas même de barbe; il y a eu et il y a peut-être encore des nations d'hommes d'une taille gigantesque, et laissant à part la fable des Pygmées qui peut bien n'être qu'une exagération, on sait que les Lapons et surtout les Groenlandais sont fort au-dessous de la taille moyenne de l'homme; on prétend même qu'il y a des peuples entiers qui ont des queues comme les quadrupèdes, et sans ajouter une foi aveugle aux relations d'Hérodote et de Ctésias, on en peut du moins tirer cette opinion très vraisemblable, que si l'on avait pu faire de bonnes observations dans ces temps anciens où les peuples divers suivaient des manières de vivre plus différentes entre elles qu'ils ne font aujourd'hui, on y aurait aussi remarqué dans la figure et l'habitude du corps, des variétés beaucoup plus frappantes. Tous ces faits dont il est aisé de fournir des preuves incontestables, ne peuvent surprendre que ceux qui sont accoutumés à ne regarder que les objets qui les environnent et qui ignorent les puissants effets de la diversité des climats, de l'air, des aliments, de la manière de vivre, des habitudes en général, et surtout la force étonnante des mêmes causes, quand elles agissent continuellement sur de longues suites de générations. Aujourd'hui que le commerce, les voyages et les conquêtes réunissent davantage les peuples divers, et que leurs manières de vivre se rapprochent sans cesse par la fréquente communication, on s'aperçoit que certaines différences nationales ont diminué, et par exemple, chacun peut remarquer que les Français d'aujourd'hui ne sont plus ces grands corps blancs et blonds décrits par les historiens latins, quoique le temps joint au mélange des Francs et des Normands, blancs et blonds eux-mêmes, eût dû rétablir ce que la fréquentation des Romains avait pu ôter à l'influence du climat, dans la constitution naturelle et le teint des habitants. Toutes ces observations sur les variétés que mille causes peuvent produire et ont produit en effet dans l'espèce humaine me font douter si divers animaux semblables aux hommes, pris par les voyageurs pour des bêtes sans beaucoup d'examen, ou à cause de quelques différences qu'ils remarquaient dans la conformation extérieure, ou seulement parce que ces animaux ne parlaient pas, ne seraient point en effet de véritables hommes sauvages, dont la race dispersée anciennement dans les bois n'avait eu occasion de développer aucune de ses facultés virtuelles, n'avait acquis aucun degré de perfection et se trouvait encore dans l'état primitif de nature. Donnons un exemple de ce que je veux dire.
     "On trouve, dit le traducteur de l'Histoire des voyages, dans le royaume de Congo quantité de ces grands animaux qu'on nomme Orang-Outang aux Indes orientales, qui tiennent comme le milieu entre l'espèce humaine et les babouins. Battel raconte que dans les forêts de Mayomba au royaume de Loango, on voit deux sortes de monstres dont les plus grands se nomment Pongos et les autres Enjokos. Les premiers ont une ressemblance exacte avec l'homme; mais ils sont beaucoup plus gros, et de fort haute taille. Avec un visage humain, ils ont les yeux fort enfoncés. Leurs mains, leurs joues, leurs oreilles sont sans poil, à l'exception des sourcils qu'ils ont fort longs. Quoiqu'ils aient le reste du corps assez velu, le poil n'en est pas fort épais, et sa couleur est brune. Enfin, la seule partie qui les distingue des hommes est la jambe qu'ils ont sans mollet. Ils marchent droits en se tenant de la main le poil du cou; leur retraite est dans les bois; ils dorment sur les arbres et s'y font une espèce de toit qui les met à couvert de la pluie. Leurs aliments sont des fruits ou des noix sauvages. Jamais ils ne mangent de chair. L'usage des Nègres qui traversent les forêts est d'y allumer des feux pendant la nuit. Ils remarquent que le matin à leur départ les pongos prennent leur place autour du feu et ne se retirent pas qu'il ne soit éteint: car avec beaucoup d'adresse, ils n'ont point assez de sens pour l'entretenir en y apportant du bois.
     Ils marchent quelquefois en troupes et tuent les Nègres qui traversent les forêts. Ils tombent même sur les éléphants qui viennent paître dans les lieux qu'ils habitent et les incommodent si fort à coups de poing ou de bâton qu'ils les forcent à prendre la fuite en poussant des cris. On ne prend jamais de pongos en vie; parce qu'ils sont si robustes que dix hommes ne suffiraient pas pour les arrêter. Mais les Nègres en prennent quantité de jeunes après avoir tué la mère, au corps de laquelle le petit s'attache fortement: lorsqu'un de ces animaux meurt, les autres couvrent son corps d'un amas de branches ou de feuillages. Purchass ajoute que dans les conversations qu'il avait eues avec Battel, il avait appris de lui-même qu'un pongo lui enleva un petit Nègre qui passa un mois entier dans la société de ces animaux; car ils ne font aucun mal aux hommes qu'ils surprennent, du moins lorsque ceux-ci ne les regardent point, comme le petit Nègre l'avait observé. Battel n'a point décrit la seconde espèce de monstre.
     Dapper confirme que le royaume de Congo est plein de ces animaux qui portent aux Indes le nom d'orang-outang, c'est-à-dire habitants des bois, et que les Africains nomment Quojas-Morros. Cette bête, dit-il, est si semblable à l'homme qu'il est tombé dans l'esprit à quelques voyageurs qu'elle pouvait être sortie d'une femme et d'un singe: chimère que les Nègres mêmes rejettent. Un de ces animaux fut transporté de Congo en Hollande et présenté au prince d'Orange Frédéric-Henri. Il était de la hauteur d'un enfant de trois ans et d'un embonpoint médiocre, mais carré et bien proportionné, fort agile et fort vif; les jambes charnues et robustes, tout le devant du corps nu, mais le derrière couvert de poils noirs. A la première vue, son visage ressemblait à celui d'un homme, mais il avait le nez plat et recourbé; ses oreilles étaient aussi celles de l'espèce humaine; son sein, car c'était une femelle, était potelé, son nombril enfoncé, ses épaules fort bien jointes, ses mains divisées en doigts et en pouces, ses mollets et ses talons gras et charnus. Il marchait souvent droit sur ses jambes, il était capable de lever et porter des fardeaux assez lourds. Lorsqu'il voulait boire, il prenait d'une main le couvercle du pot, et tenait le fond, de l'autre. Ensuite il s'essuyait gracieusement les lèvres. Il se couchait pour dormir, la tête sur un coussin, se couvrant avec tant d'adresse qu'on l'aurait pris pour un homme au lit. Les Nègres font d'étranges récits de cet animal. Ils assurent non seulement qu'il force les femmes et les filles, mais qu'il ose attaquer des hommes armés. En un mot il y a beaucoup d'apparence que c'est le satyre des Anciens. Merolla ne parle peut-être que de ces animaux lorsqu'il raconte que les Nègres prennent quelquefois dans leurs chasses des hommes et des femmes sauvages."
     Il est encore parlé de ces espèces d'animaux anthropoformes dans le troisième tome de la même Histoire des voyages sous le nom de Beggos et de Mandrills; mais pour nous en tenir aux relations précédentes on trouve dans la description de ces prétendus monstres des conformités frappantes avec l'espèce humaine, et des différences moindres que celles qu'on pourrait assigner d'homme à homme. On ne voit point dans ces passages les raisons sur lesquelles les auteurs se fondent pour refuser aux animaux en question le nom d'hommes sauvages, mais il est aisé de conjecturer que c'est à cause de leur stupidité, et aussi parce qu'ils ne parlaient pas; raisons faibles pour ceux qui savent que quoique l'organe de la parole soit naturel à l'homme, la parole elle-même ne lui est pourtant pas naturelle, et qui connaissent jusqu'à quel point sa perfectibilité peut avoir élevé l'homme civil au-dessus de son état originel. Le petit nombre de lignes que contiennent ces descriptions nous peut faire juger combien ces animaux ont été mal observés et avec quels préjugés ils ont été vus. Par exemple, ils sont qualifiés de monstres, et cependant on convient qu'ils engendrent. Dans un endroit Battel dit que les pongos tuent les Nègres qui traversent les forêts, dans un autre Purchass ajoute qu'ils ne leur font aucun mal, même quand ils les surprennent; du moins lorsque les Nègres ne s'attachent pas à les regarder. Les pongos s'assemblent autour des feux allumés par les Nègres, quand ceux-ci se retirent, et se retirent à leur tour quand le feu est éteint; voilà le fait, voici maintenant le commentaire de l'observateur: Car avec beaucoup d'adresse, ils n'ont pas assez de sens pour l'entretenir en y apportant du bois. Je voudrais deviner comment Battel ou Purchass son compilateur a pu savoir que la retraite des pongos était un effet de leur bêtise plutôt que de leur volonté. Dans un climat tel que Loango, le feu n'est pas une chose fort nécessaire aux animaux, et si les Nègres en allument, c'est moins contre le froid que pour effrayer les bêtes féroces; il est donc très simple qu'après avoir été quelque temps réjouis par la flamme ou s'être bien réchauffés, les pongos s'ennuient de rester toujours à la même place et s'en aillent à leur pâture, qui demande plus de temps que s'ils mangeaient de la chair. D'ailleurs, on sait que la plupart des animaux, sans en excepter l'homme, sont naturellement paresseux, et qu'ils se refusent à toutes sortes de soins qui ne sont pas d'une absolue nécessité. Enfin il paraît fort étrange que les pongos dont on vante l'adresse et la force, les pongos qui savent enterrer leurs morts et se faire des toits de branchages, ne sachent pas pousser des tisons dans le feu. Je me souviens d'avoir vu un singe faire cette même manoeuvre qu'on ne veut pas que les pongos puissent faire; il est vrai que mes idées n'étant pas alors tournées de ce côté, je fis moi-même la faute que je reproche à nos voyageurs, et je négligeai d'examiner si l'intention du singe était en effet d'entretenir le feu, ou simplement, comme je crois, d'imiter l'action d'un homme. Quoi qu'il en soit, il est bien démontré que le singe n'est pas une variété de l'homme, non seulement parce qu'il est privé de la faculté de parler, mais surtout parce qu'on est sûr que son espèce n'a point celle de se perfectionner qui est le caractère spécifique de l'espèce humaine. Expériences qui ne paraissent pas avoir été faites sur le pongo et l'orang-outang avec assez de soin pour en pouvoir tirer la même conclusion. Il y aurait pourtant un moyen par lequel, si l'orang-outang ou d'autres étaient de l'espèce humaine, les observateurs les plus grossiers pourraient s'en assurer même avec démonstration; mais outre qu'une seule génération ne suffirait pas pour cette expérience, elle doit passer pour impraticable, parce qu'il faudrait que ce qui n'est qu'une supposition fût démontré vrai, avant que l'épreuve qui devrait constater le fait pût être tentée innocemment.
     Les jugements précipités, et qui ne sont point le fruit d'une raison éclairée, sont sujets à donner dans l'excès. Nos voyageurs font sans façon des bêtes sous les noms de Pongos, de Mandrills, d'Orang-Outang, de ces mêmes êtres dont sous le nom de Satyres, de Faunes, de Sylvains, les Anciens faisaient des divinités. Peut-être après des recherches plus exactes trouvera-t-on que ce sont des hommes. En attendant, il me paraît qu'il y a bien autant de raison de s'en rapporter là-dessus à Merolla, religieux lettré, témoin oculaire, et qui avec toute sa naïveté ne laissait pas d'être homme d'esprit, qu'au marchand Battel, à Dapper, à Purchass, et aux autres compilateurs.
     Quel jugement pense-t-on qu'eussent porté de pareils observateurs sur l'enfant trouvé en 1694 dont j'ai déjà parlé ci-devant, qui ne donnait aucune marque de raison, marchait sur ses pieds et sur ses mains, n'avait aucun langage et formait des sons qui ne ressemblaient en rien à ceux d'un homme? Il fut longtemps, continue le même philosophe qui me fournit ce fait, avant de pouvoir proférer quelques paroles, encore le fit-il d'une manière barbare. Aussitôt qu'il put parler, on l'interrogea sur son premier état, mais il ne s'en souvint non plus que nous nous souvenons de ce qui nous est arrivé au berceau. Si malheureusement pour lui cet enfant fût tombé dans les mains de nos voyageurs, on ne peut douter qu'après avoir remarqué son silence et sa stupidité, ils n'eussent pris le parti de le renvoyer dans les bois ou de l'enfermer dans une ménagerie; après quoi ils en auraient savamment parlé dans de belles relations, comme d'une bête fort curieuse qui ressemblait assez à l'homme.
     Depuis trois ou quatre cents ans que les habitants de l'Europe inondent les autres parties du monde et publient sans cesse de nouveaux recueils de voyages et de relations, je suis persuadé que nous ne connaissons d'hommes que les seuls Européens; encore paraît-il aux préjugés ridicules qui ne sont pas éteints, même parmi les gens de lettres, que chacun ne fait guère sous le nom pompeux d'étude de l'homme que celle des hommes de son pays. Les particuliers ont beau aller et venir, il semble que la philosophie ne voyage point, aussi celle de chaque peuple est-elle peu propre pour un autre. La cause de ceci est manifeste, au moins pour les contrées éloignées: il n'y a guère que quatre sortes d'hommes qui fassent des voyages de long cours; les marins, les marchands, les soldats et les missionnaires. Or, on ne doit guère s'attendre que les trois premières classes fournissent de bons observateurs et quant à ceux de la quatrième, occupés de la vocation sublime qui les appelle, quand ils ne seraient pas sujets à des préjugés d'état comme tous les autres, on doit croire qu'ils ne se livreraient pas volontiers à des recherches qui paraissent de pure curiosité et qui les détourneraient des travaux plus importants auxquels ils se destinent. D'ailleurs, pour prêcher utilement l'Evangile, il ne faut que du zèle et Dieu donne le reste, mais pour étudier les hommes il faut des talents que Dieu ne s'engage à donner à personne et qui ne sont pas toujours le partage des saints. On n'ouvre pas un livre de voyages où l'on ne trouve des descriptions de caractères et de moeurs; mais on est tout étonné d'y voir que ces gens qui ont tant décrit de choses, n'ont dit que ce que chacun savait déjà, n'ont su apercevoir à l'autre bout du monde que ce qu'il n'eût tenu qu'à eux de remarquer sans sortir de leur rue, et que ces traits vrais qui distinguent les nations, et qui frappent les yeux faits pour voir ont presque toujours échappé aux leurs. De là est venu ce bel adage de morale, si rebattu par la tourbe philosophesque, que les hommes sont partout les mêmes, qu'ayant partout les mêmes passions et les mêmes vices, il est assez inutile de chercher à caractériser les différents peuples; ce qui est à peu près aussi bien raisonné que si l'on disait qu'on ne saurait distinguer Pierre d'avec Jacques, parce qu'ils ont tous deux un nez, une bouche et des yeux.
     Ne verra-t-on jamais renaître ces temps heureux où les peuples ne se mêlaient point de philosopher, mais où les Platon, les Thalès et les Pythagore épris d'un ardent désir de savoir, entreprenaient les plus grands voyages uniquement pour s'instruire, et allaient au loin secouer le joug des préjugés nationaux, apprendre à connaître les hommes par leurs conformités et par leurs différences et acquérir ces connaissances universelles qui ne sont point celles d'un siècle ou d'un pays exclusivement mais qui, étant de tous les temps et de tous les lieux, sont pour ainsi dire la science commune des sages?
     On admire la magnificence de quelques curieux qui ont fait ou fait faire à grands frais des voyages en Orient avec des savants et des peintres, pour y dessiner des masures et déchiffrer ou copier des inscriptions: mais j'ai peine à concevoir comment dans un siècle où l'on se pique de belles connaissances il ne se trouve pas deux hommes bien unis, riches, l'un en argent, l'autre en génie, tous deux aimant la gloire et aspirant à l'immortalité, dont l'un sacrifie vingt mille écus de son bien et l'autre dix ans de sa vie à un célèbre voyage autour du monde; pour y étudier, non toujours des pierres et des plantes, mais une fois les hommes et les moeurs, et qui, après tant de siècles employés à mesurer et considérer la maison, s'avisent enfin d'en vouloir connaître les habitants.
     Les académiciens qui ont parcouru les parties septentrionales de l'Europe et méridionales de l'Amérique avaient plus pour objet de les visiter en géomètres qu'en philosophes. Cependant, comme ils étaient à la fois l'un et l'autre, on ne peut pas regarder comme tout à fait inconnues les régions qui ont été vues et décrites par les La Condamine et les Maupertuis. Le joaillier Chardin, qui a voyagé comme Platon, n'a rien laissé à dire sur la Perse; la Chine paraît avoir été bien observée par les Jésuites. Kempfer donne une idée passable du peu qu'il a vu dans le Japon. A ces relations près, nous ne connaissons point les peuples des Indes orientales, fréquentées uniquement par des Européens plus curieux de remplir leurs bourses que leurs têtes. L'Afrique entière et ses nombreux habitants, aussi singuliers par leur caractère que par leur couleur, sont encore à examiner; toute la terre est couverte de nations dont nous ne connaissons que les noms, et nous nous mêlons de juger le genre humain! Supposons un Montesquieu, un Buffon, un Diderot, un Duclos, un d'Alembert, un Condillac, ou des hommes de cette trempe, voyageant pour instruire leurs compatriotes, observant et décrivant comme ils savent faire, la Turquie, l'Egypte, la Barbarie, l'empire de Maroc, la Guinée, le pays des Cafres, l'intérieur de l'Afrique et ses côtes orientales, les Malabares, le Mogol, les rives du Gange, les royaumes de Siam, de Pegu et d'Ava, la Chine, la Tartarie, et surtout le Japon; puis dans l'autre hémisphère le Mexique, le Pérou, le Chili, les Terres magellaniques, sans oublier les Patagons vrais ou faux, le Tucuman, le Paraguay s'il était possible, le Brésil, enfin les Caraïbes, la Floride et toutes les contrées sauvages, voyage le plus important de tous et celui qu'il faudrait faire avec le plus de soin; supposons que ces nouveaux Hercules, de retour de ces courses mémorables, fissent ensuite à loisir l'histoire naturelle, morale et politique, de ce qu'ils auraient vu, nous verrions nous-mêmes sortir un monde nouveau de dessous leur plume, et nous apprendrions ainsi à connaître le nôtre. Je dis que quand de pareils observateurs affirmeront d'un tel animal que c'est un homme, et d'un autre que c'est une bête, il faudra les en croire; mais ce serait une grande simplicité de s'en rapporter là-dessus à des voyageurs grossiers, sur lesquels on serait quelquefois tenté de faire la même question qu'ils se mêlent de résoudre sur d'autres animaux.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 40.

(11.) This appears to me as clear as Day-Light, and Icannot conceive whence our Philosophers can derive all the Passions they attribute to natural Man. Except the bare physical Necessaries, which Nature herself requires, all our other Wants are merely the Effects of Habit, before which they were no Wants, or of our inordinate Cravings, but we don't crave for that which we are not in a Condition to know. Hence it follows that as savage Man longs for nothing but what he knows, and knows nothing but what he actually possesses or can easily acquire, nothing can be so calm as his Soul, or so confined as his Understanding.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 11) Cela me paraît de la dernière évidence, et je ne saurais concevoir d'où nos philosophes peuvent faire naître toutes les passions qu'ils prêtent à l'homme naturel. Excepté le seul nécessaire physique, que la nature même demande, tous nos autres besoins ne sont tels que par l'habitude avant laquelle ils n'étaient point des besoins, ou par nos désirs, et l'on ne désire point ce qu'on n'est pas en état de connaître. D'où il suit que l'homme sauvage ne désirant que les choses qu'il connaît et ne connaissant que celles dont la possession est en son pouvoir ou facile à acquérir, rien ne doit être si tranquille que son âme et rien si borné que son esprit.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 50.

(12.) I find in Locke's Civil Government an Objection, which appears to me too specious to be here dissembled. "The End, says this Philosopher, of Conjunction between Male and Female, being not barely Procreation, but the Continuation of the Species: this Conjunction between Male and Female ought to last, even after Procreation, so long as is necessary to the Nourishment and Support of the young Ones, who are to be sustained by those who got them, till they are able to shift and provide for themselves. This Rule, which the infinite wise Maker hath set to the Works of his Hands, we find the inferior Creature steadily obey. In those viviparous Animals which feed on Grass, the Conjunction between Male and Female lasts no longer than the very Act of Copulation; because the Teat of the Dam being sufficient to nourish the Young, till it be able to feed on Grass, the Male only begets, but concerns not himself for the Female or Young, to whose Sustenance he can contribute nothing. But in Beasts of Prey the Conjunction lasts longer; because the Dam not being able well to subsist herself, and nourish her numerous Off-spring by her own Prey alone, a more laborious, as well as more dangerous way of living than by feeding on Grass; the Assistance of the Male is necessary to the Maintenance of their common Family, which cannot subsist till they are able to prey for themselves, but by the joint Care of Male and Female. The same is to be observed in all Birds (except some domestick ones, where plenty of Food excuses the Cock from feeding and taking care of the Young Brood) whose Young needing Food in the Nest, the Cock and Hen continue Mates till the Young are able to use their Wing, and provide for themselves.
     And herin I think lies the chief, if not the only reason, why the Male and Female in Mankind are tyed to a longer Conjunction than other Creatures, viz. Because the Female is capable of conceiving, and de facto is commonly with Child again, and brings forth to a new Birth long before the former is out of a Dependency for Support on his Parents help, and able to shift for himself, and has all the Assistance is due to him from his Parents, whereby the Father, who is bound to take care for those he hath begot, is under an Obligation to continue in Conjugal Society with the same Woman longer than other Creatures, whose Young being able to subsist of themselves, before the Time of Procreation returns again, the conjugal Bond dissolves of itself; and they are at Liberty; 'till Hymen, at his usual Anniversary Season, summons them again to chuse new Mates. Wherein one cannot but admire the Wisdom of the great Creator, who having given to Man an Ability to lay up for the future, as well as supply the present Necessity, hath made it necessary, that Society of Man and Wife should be more lasting than of Male and Female amongst other Creatures; that so their Industry might be encouraged, and their Interest better united, to make Provision, and lay up up Goods for their common Issue, which uncertain Mixture, or easy and frequent Solutions of conjugal Society would mightily disturb."
     The same Love of Truth, which has made me faithfully exhibit this Objection, induces me to accompany it with some Remarks, if not to refute, at least to throw some Light upon it.
     1. I must in the first place observe, that Moral Proofs are of no great Force in physical Matters, and that they rather serve to account for Facts which exist than to ascertain the real Existence of these Facts. Now this is the kind of Proof made use of by Mr. Locke in the Passage I have cited; for though it may be the Interest of the Human Species, that the Union between Man and Woman should be permanent, it does not follow that such an Union was established by Nature; otherwise Nature must be allowed to have likewise instituted Civil Society, Arts, Commerce, and every thing else pretended to be useful to Mankind.
     2. I don't know where Mr. Locke has learned, that among Animals of Prey the Society between Male and Female lasts longer than among those who live upon Grass, and that one assists the other in rearing their young ones: For we don't find that the Dog, the Cat, the Bear, or the Wolf show greater Regard to their Females than the Horse, the Ram, the Bull, the Stag, and all other Quadrupeds do to theirs. On the contrary, it seems that, if the Assistance of the Male was necessary to the Female for the Preservation of their young ones, it would be particularly so among those Animals who live upon nothing but Grass, because the Mother requires more Time to feed that Way, and is all the while obliged to neglect her Offspring, whereas the Prey of a Female Bear or Wolf is devoured in an Instant, and she has therefore, without suffering from Hunger, more Time to suckle her Litter. This Observation is confirmed by the relative Number of Teats and young ones, which distinguishes the carnivorous from the frugivorous Kinds, and of which I have already spoken in Note (8). If this Observation is just and general, a Woman's having but two Breasts, and seldom bearing more than one Child at a Time, furnishes one Reason more, and a strong one, for doubting if the Human Species is naturally carnivorous; so that to draw Mr. Locke's Conclusion, it would seem requisite entirely to invert his Argument. There is as little Solidity in the same Distinction when applied to Birds, for who can believe the Union of Male and Female is more durable among Vultures and Ravens than among Doves. We have two Species of domestic Birds, the Duck and the Pigeon, which afford us Examples diametically opposite to this Author's System. The Pigeon lives entirely upon Corn, and remains constantly united to his Mate, and both in common feed their young ones. The Duck, whose Voracity is notorious, takes no Notice either of his young ones or their Mother, and contributes nothing towards their Subsistence; and among Cocks and Hens, a Species scarce less ravenous, the former is never known to give himself any Trouble about Eggs or Chickens. If among other Species the Male shares with the Female the Care of feeding their young ones, it is because those Birds, not being able to fly as soon as hatched, and which the Mother cannot suckle, can much less do without the Father's Assistance than Quadrupeds, who, for some time at least, require nothing but the Mother's Nipple.
     3. There is a great Deal of Uncertainty in the principal Fact upon which Mr. Locke builds his whole Argument. For to know if, in a pure State of Nature, Woman, as he pretends, generally becomes pregnant, and brings forth a new Child a long Time before that immediately preceeding can himself supply his Wants, Experiments would be requisite, which assuredly Mr. Locke had not made, and which no one is in a Condition to make. The continual Cohabitation of Husband and Wife is so near an Occasion for the former to expose herself to a new Pregnancy, that it is hardly probable a fortuitous Concourse, or a mere Blaze of Passion should produce as frequent Effects in a pure State of Nature, as in that of conjugal Society; a Tardiness, which would contribute perhaps to render the Children more robust, and which besides might be made up by the Power of conceiving being extended to a more advanced Age with Women, who had not so much abused it in their younger Days. In regard to Children, there are many Reasons for believing that their Power and Organs develop themselves among us later than they did in the primitive State of which I speak. The original Weakness which they derive from the Constitution of their Parents, the Care taken to fold up, strain and cramp all their Members, the Softness in which they are reared, perhaps too the Use of another Woman's Milk, ever thing opposes and checks in them the first Operations of Nature. The Application we oblige them to bestow in a thousand Things upon which we constantly fix their Attention, while their corporeal Faculties are left without Exercise, may likewise contribute a great deal to retard their Growth. So that if, instead of overloading and fatiguing their Minds a thousand different Ways, we permitted them to exercise their Bodies in those continual Motions, which Nature seems to require, it is probable they would be much earlier in a Condition to walk and stir about, and provide for themselves.
     Mr. Locke, in fine, proves at most that there may be in Man a Motive to live with the Woman when she has a Child; but he by no Means proves that there was any Necessity for his living with her before her Delivery and during the nine Months of her Pregnancy: If a pregnant Woman comes to be indifferent to the Man by whom she is pregnant during these nine Months, if she even comes to be entirely forgot by him, why should he assist her after her Delivery? Why should he help her to rear a Child, which he does not know to be his, and whose Birth he neither foresaw nor resolved to be the Author of. 'Tis evident that Mr. Locke supposes the very thing in question: For we are not enquiring why Man should continue to live with the Woman after her Delivery, but why he should continue to attach himself to her after Conception. The Appetite satisfied, Man no longer stands in need of any particular Woman, nor the Woman of any particular Man. The Man no longer troubles his Head about what has happened; perhaps he has not the least Notion of what must follow. One goes this Way, the other that, and there is little Reason to think that at the End of nine Months they should remember ever to have known each other: For this kind of Remembrance, by which one Individual gives the Preference to another for the Act of Generation, requires, as I have proved in the Text, a greater Degree of Improvement or Corruption in the Human Understanding, than Man can be supposed to have attained in the State of Animality we here speak of. Another Woman therefore may serve to satisfy the new Desires of the Man full as well as the one he has already known; and another Man in like Manner satisfy the Woman's, supposing her subject to the same Appetite during her Pregnancy, a thing which may be reasonably doubted. But if in a State of Nature, the Woman, when she has conceived, no longer feels the Passion of Love, the Obstacle to her associating with Men becomes still greater, since she no longer has any Occasion for the Man by whom she is pregnant, or any other. There is therefore no Reason on the Man's Side, for his coveting the same Woman, nor on the Woman's for her coveting the same Man. Locke's Argument therefore falls to the Ground, and all the Logick of this Philosopher has not secured him from the Mistake committed by Hobbes and others. They had to explain a Fact in the State of Nature, that is in a State in which every Man lived by himself without any Connection with other Men, and no one Man had any Motives to associate with any other, nor perhaps, which is still worse, Men in general to herd together; and it never came into their Heads to look back beyond the Times of Society, that is to say, those Times in which Men had always Motives for herding together, and in which one Man has often Motives for associating with this or that particular Man, this or that particular Woman.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 12) Je trouve dans le Gouvernement civil de Locke une objection qui me paraît trop spécieuse pour qu'il me soit permis de la dissimuler. "La fin de la société entre le mâle et la femelle, dit ce philosophe, n'étant pas simplement de procréer, mais de continuer l'espèce, cette société doit durer, même après la procréation, du moins aussi longtemps qu'il est nécessaire pour la nourriture et la conservation des procréés, c'est-à-dire jusqu'à ce qu'ils soient capables de pourvoir eux-mêmes à leurs besoins. Cette règle que la sagesse infinie du Créateur a établie sur les oeuvres de ses mains, nous voyons que les créatures inférieures à l'homme l'observent constamment et avec exactitude. Dans ces animaux qui vivent d'herbe, la société entre le mâle et la femelle ne dure pas plus longtemps que chaque acte de copulation, parce que les mamelles de la mère étant suffisantes pour nourrir les petits jusqu'à ce qu'ils soient capables de paître l'herbe, le mâle se contente d'engendrer et il ne se mêle plus après cela de la femelle ni des petits, à la subsistance desquels il ne peut rien contribuer. Mais au regard des bêtes de proie, la société dure plus longtemps, à cause que la mère ne pouvant pas bien pourvoir à sa subsistance propre et nourrir en même temps ses petits par sa seule proie, qui est une voie de se nourrir et plus laborieuse et plus dangereuse que n'est celle de se nourrir d'herbe, l'assistance du mâle est tout à fait nécessaire pour le maintien de leur commune famille, si l'on peut user de ce terme; laquelle jusqu'à ce qu'elle puisse aller chercher quelque proie ne saurait subsister que par les soins du mâle et de la femelle. On remarque le même dans tous les oiseaux, si l'on excepte quelques oiseaux domestiques qui se trouvent dans des lieux où la continuelle abondance de nourriture exempte le mâle du soin de nourrir les petits; on voit que pendant que les petits dans leur nid ont besoin d'aliments, le mâle et la femelle y en portent, jusqu'à ce que ces petits-là puissent voler et pourvoir à leur subsistance.
     Et en cela, à mon avis, consiste la principale, si ce n'est la seule raison pourquoi le mâle et la femelle dans le genre humain sont obligés à une société plus longue que n'entretiennent les autres créatures. Cette raison est que la femme est capable de concevoir et est pour l'ordinaire derechef grosse et fait un nouvel enfant, longtemps avant que le précédent soit hors d'état de se passer du secours de ses parents et puisse lui-même pourvoir à ses besoins. Ainsi un père étant obligé de prendre soin de ceux qu'il a engendrés, et de prendre ce soin-là pendant longtemps, il est aussi dans l'obligation de continuer à vivre dans la société conjugale avec la même femme de qui il les a eus, et de demeurer dans cette société beaucoup plus longtemps que les autres créatures, dont les petits pouvant subsister d'eux-mêmes, avant que le temps d'une nouvelle procréation vienne, le lien du mâle et de la femelle se rompt de lui-même et l'un et l'autre se trouvent dans une pleine liberté, jusqu'à ce que cette saison qui a coutume de solliciter les animaux à se joindre ensemble les oblige de choisir de nouvelles compagnes. Et ici l'on ne saurait admirer assez la sagesse du Créateur, qui, ayant donné à l'homme des qualités propres pour pourvoir à l'avenir aussi bien qu'au présent, a voulu et a fait en sorte que la société de l'homme durât beaucoup plus longtemps que celle du mâle et de la femelle parmi les autres créatures; afin que par là l'industrie de l'homme et de la femme fût plus excitée, et que leurs intérêts fussent mieux unis, dans la vue de faire des provisions pour leurs enfants et de leur laisser du bien: rien ne pouvant être plus préjudiciable à des enfants qu'une conjonction incertaine et vague ou une dissolution facile et fréquente de la société conjugale."
     Le même amour de la vérité qui m'a fait exposer sincèrement cette objection m'excite à l'accompagner de quelques remarques, sinon pour la résoudre, au moins pour l'éclaircir.
     a. J'observerai d'abord que les preuves morales n'ont pas une grande force en matière de physique et qu'elles servent plutôt à rendre raison des faits existants qu'à constater l'existence réelle de ces faits. Or tel est le genre de preuve que M. Locke emploie dans le passage que je viens de rapporter; car quoiqu'il puisse être avantageux à l'espèce humaine que l'union de l'homme et de la femme soit permanente, il ne s'ensuit pas que cela ait été ainsi établi par la nature, autrement il faudrait dire qu'elle a aussi institué la société civile, les arts, le commerce et tout ce qu'on prétend être utile aux hommes.
     b. J'ignore où M. Locke a trouvé qu'entre les animaux de proie la société du mâle et de la femelle dure plus longtemps que parmi ceux qui vivent d'herbe et que l'un aide l'autre à nourrir les petits. Car on ne voit pas que le chien, le chat, l'ours, ni le loup reconnaissent leur femelle mieux que le cheval, le bélier, le taureau, le cerf ni tous les autres quadrupèdes ne reconnaissent la leur. Il semble au contraire que, si le secours du mâle était nécessaire à la femelle pour conserver ses petits, ce serait surtout dans les espèces qui ne vivent que d'herbe, parce qu'il faut fort longtemps à la mère pour paître, et que durant tout cet intervalle elle est forcée de négliger sa portée, au lieu que la proie d'une ourse ou d'une louve est dévorée en un instant et qu'elle a, sans souffrir la faim, plus de temps pour allaiter ses petits. Ce raisonnement est confirmé par une observation sur le nombre relatif de mamelles et de petits qui distingue les espèces carnassières des frugivores et dont j'ai parlé dans la note 2 de la page 167. Si cette observation est juste et générale, la femme n'ayant que deux mamelles et ne faisant guère qu'un enfant à la fois, voilà une forte raison de plus pour douter que l'espèce humaine soit naturellement carnassière, de sorte qu'il semble que pour tirer la conclusion de Locke, il faudrait retourner tout à fait son raisonnement. Il n'y a pas plus de solidité dans la même distinction appliquée aux oiseaux. Car qui pourra se persuader que l'union du mâle et de la femelle soit plus durable parmi les vautours et les corbeaux que parmi les tourterelles? Nous avons deux espèces d'oiseaux domestiques, la cane et le pigeon, qui nous fournissent des exemples directement contraires au système de cet auteur. Le pigeon, qui ne vit que de grain, reste uni à sa femelle et ils nourrissent leurs petits en commun. Le canard, dont la voracité est connue, ne reconnaît ni sa femelle ni ses petits et n'aide en rien à leur subsistance, et parmi les poules, espèce qui n'est guère moins carnassière, on ne voit pas que le coq se mette aucunement en peine de la couvée. Que si dans d'autres espèces le mâle partage avec la femelle le soin de nourrir les petits, c'est que les oiseaux qui d'abord ne peuvent voler et que la mère ne peut allaiter sont beaucoup moins en état de se passer de l'assistance du père que les quadrupèdes à qui suffit la mamelle de la mère, au moins durant quelque temps.
     c. Il y a bien de l'incertitude sur le fait principal qui sert de base à tout le raisonnement de M. Locke. Car, pour savoir si, comme il le prétend, dans le pur état de nature la femme est pour l'ordinaire derechef grosse et fait un nouvel enfant longtemps avant que le précédent puisse pourvoir lui-même à ses besoins, il faudrait des expériences qu'assurément Locke n'avait pas faites et que personne n'est à portée de faire. La cohabitation continuelle du mari et de la femme est une occasion si prochaine de s'exposer à une nouvelle grossesse qu'il est bien difficile de croire que la rencontre fortuite ou la seule impulsion du tempérament produisît des effets aussi fréquents dans le pur état de nature que dans celui de la société conjugale; lenteur qui contribuerait peut-être à rendre les enfants plus robustes, et qui d'ailleurs pourrait être compensée par la faculté de concevoir, prolongée dans un plus grand âge chez les femmes qui en auraient moins abusé dans leur jeunesse. A l'égard des enfants, il y a bien des raisons de croire que leurs forces et leurs organes se développèrent plus tard parmi nous qu'ils ne faisaient dans l'état primitif dont je parle. La faiblesse originelle qu'ils tirent de la constitution des parents, les soins qu'on prend d'envelopper et gêner tous leurs membres, la mollesse dans laquelle ils sont élevés, peut-être l'usage d'un autre lait que celui de leur mère, tout contrarie et retarde en eux les premiers progrès de la nature. L'application qu'on les oblige de donner à mille choses sur lesquelles on fixe continuellement leur attention, tandis qu'on ne donne aucun exercice à leurs forces corporelles, peut encore faire une diversion considérable à leur accroissement; de sorte que, si au lieu de surcharger et fatiguer d'abord leurs esprits de mille manières, on laissait exercer leurs corps aux mouvements continuels que la nature semble leur demander, il est à croire qu'ils seraient beaucoup plus tôt en état de marcher, d'agir et de pourvoir eux-mêmes à leurs besoins.
     d. Enfin M. Locke prouve tout au plus qu'il pourrait bien y avoir dans l'homme un motif de demeurer attaché à la femme lorsqu'elle a un enfant; mais il ne prouve nullement qu'il a dû s'y attacher avant l'accouchement et pendant les neuf mois de la grossesse. Si telle femme est indifférente à l'homme pendant ces neuf mois, si même elle lui devient inconnue, pourquoi la secourra-t-il après l'accouchement? pourquoi lui aidera-t-il à élever un enfant qu'il ne sait pas seulement lui appartenir, et dont il n'a résolu ni prévu la naissance? M. Locke suppose évidemment ce qui est en question, car il ne s'agit pas de savoir pourquoi l'homme demeurera attaché à la femme après l'accouchement, mais pourquoi il s'attachera à elle après la conception. L'appétit satisfait, l'homme n'a plus besoin de telle femme, ni la femme de tel homme. Celui-ci n'a pas le moindre souci ni peut-être la moindre idée des suites de son action. L'un s'en va d'un côté, l'autre d'un autre, et il n'y a pas d'apparence qu'au bout de neuf mois ils aient la mémoire de s'être connus, car cette espèce de mémoire par laquelle un individu donne la préférence à un individu pour l'acte de la génération exige, comme je le prouve dans le texte, plus de progrès ou de corruption dans l'entendement humain qu'on ne peut lui en supposer dans l'état d'animalité dont il s'agit ici. Une autre femme peut donc contenter les nouveaux désirs de l'homme aussi commodément que celle qu'il a déjà connue, et un autre homme contenter de même la femme, supposé qu'elle soit pressée du même appétit pendant l'état de grossesse, de quoi l'on peut raisonnablement douter. Que si dans l'état de nature la femme ne ressent plus la passion de l'amour après la conception de l'enfant, l'obstacle à la société avec l'homme en devient encore beaucoup plus grand, puisqu'alors elle n'a plus besoin ni de l'homme qui l'a fécondée ni d'aucun d'autre. Il n'y a donc dans l'homme aucune raison de rechercher la même femme, ni dans la femme aucune raison de rechercher le même homme. Le raisonnement de Locke tombe donc en ruine et toute la dialectique de ce philosophe ne l'a pas garanti de la faute que Hobbes et d'autres ont commise. Ils avaient à expliquer un fait de l'état de nature, c'est-à-dire d'un état où les hommes vivaient isolés, et où tel homme n'avait aucun motif de demeurer à côté de tel homme, ni peut-être les hommes de demeurer à côté les uns des autres, ce qui est bien pis; et ils n'ont pas songé à se transporter au-delà des siècles de société, c'est-à-dire de ces temps où les hommes ont toujours une raison de demeurer près les uns des autres, et où tel homme a souvent raison de demeurer à côté de tel homme ou de telle femme.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 52.

(13.) I by no Means intend to launch out into the philosophical Reflections that may be made on the Advantages and Disadvantages of this Institution of Language; 'tis not for Persons like me to expect Leave to attack vulgar Errors, and the lettered Mob respect their Prejudices too much to bear with Patience my pretended Paradoxes. Let us therefore let those speak in whom it has not been deemed criminal to dare sometimes take part with Reason againt the Opinion of the Multitude. "Nor should we be less happy, if all these Languages, whose Multiplicity occasions so much Trouble and Confusion, were utterly abolished, and Men knew no other Method of speaking to each other but by Signs, Motions, and Gestures. Whereas Things are now come to such a Pass, that Animals, whom we generally consider as Brute and void of Reason, may be deemed much happier in this Respect, since they can more readily, and perhaps too more aptly, express their Thoughts and Feelings, without an Interpreter, than any Man living can his, especially when obliged to make Use of a foreign Language." — Is. Vossius, de Poemat. Cant. et Viribus Rythmi, p.66.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 13) Je me garderai bien de m'embarquer dans les réflexions philosophiques qu'il y aurait à faire sur les avantages et les inconvénients de cette institution des langues; ce n'est pas à moi qu'on permet d'attaquer les erreurs vulgaires, et le peuple lettré respecte trop ses préjugés pour supporter patiemment mes prétendus paradoxes. Laissons donc parler les gens à qui l'on n'a point fait un crime d'oser prendre quelquefois le parti de la raison contre l'avis de la multitude. Nec quidquam felicitati humani generis decederet, pulsa tot linguarum peste et confusione, unam artem callerent mortales, et signis, motibus, gestibusque licitum foret quidvis explicare. Nunc vero ita comparatum est, ut animalium quoe vulgo bruta creduntur, melior longe quam nostra hac in parte videatur conditio, ut pote quoe promptius et forsan felicius, sensus et cogitationes suas sine interprete significent, quam ulli queant mortales, proesertim si peregrino utantur sermone. Is. Vossius, de Poemat. Cant. et Viribus Rythmi, p.66.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 62.

(14.) Plato shewing how necessary the Ideas of discrete Quantity and its Relations are in the most trifling Arts, laughs with great Reason at the Authors of his Age who pretended that Palamedes had invented Numbers at the Siege of Troy, as if, says he, it was possible that Agamemnon should not know 'till then how many Legs he had. In fact, every one must see how impossible it was that Society and the Arts should have attained the Degree of Perfection in which they were at the Time of that famous Siege, unless Men had been acquainted with the Use of Numbers and Calculation: But the Necessity of understanding Numbers previous to the Acquisition of other Sciences does by no Means help us to account for the Invention of them; the Names of Numbers once known, it is an easy Matter to explain the Meaning of them, and excite the Ideas which these Names present; but to invent them, it was necessary, before these Ideas could be conceived, that Man should have exercised himself in considering Beings merely according to their Essence, and independently of every other Perception; an Abstraction very painful and very metaphysical, and withal not very natural, yet such, however, that without it these Ideas could never have been shifted from one Species or Genius to another, or Numbers become universal. A Savage might separately consider his Right Leg and his Left Leg, or consider them together under the indivisible Idea of a Pair, without ever thinking that he had two; for the representative Idea, which paints an Object to us, is one thing, and the numerical Idea, which determines it, another: He could still less reckon as far as five; and though on applying his Hands one to another he might observe that the Fingers exactly answered to each other, he was very far from thinking on their numerical Quality. He knew as little of the Number of his Fingers as of his Hairs; and if, after making him understand what Numbers are, some one had told him that he had as many Toes as Fingers, he would perhaps have been greatly surprized to find it true on comparing them together.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 14) Platon montrant combien les idées de la quantité discrète et de ses rapports sont nécessaires dans les moindres arts, se moque avec raison des auteurs de son temps qui prétendaient que Palamède avait inventé les nombres au siège de Troie, comme si, dit ce philosophe, Agamemnon eût pu ignorer jusque-là combien il avait de jambes? En effet, on sent l'impossibilité que la société et les arts fussent parvenus où ils étaient déjà du temps du siège de Troie, sans que les hommes eussent l'usage des nombres et du calcul: mais la nécessité de connaître les nombres avant que d'acquérir d'autres connaissances n'en rend pas l'invention plus aisée à imaginer; les noms des nombres une fois connus, il est aisé d'en expliquer le sens et d'exciter les idées que ces noms représentent, mais pour les inventer, il fallut, avant que de concevoir ces mêmes idées, s'être pour ainsi dire familiarisé avec les méditations philosophiques, s'être exercé à considérer les êtres par leur seule essence et indépendamment de toute autre perception, abstraction très pénible, très métaphysique, très peu naturelle et sans laquelle cependant ces idées n'eussent jamais pu se transporter d'une espèce ou d'un genre à un autre, ni les nombres devenir universels. Un sauvage pouvait considérer séparément sa jambe droite et sa jambe gauche, ou les regarder ensemble sous l'idée indivisible d'une couple sans jamais penser qu'il en avait deux; car autre chose est l'idée représentative qui nous peint un objet, et autre chose l'idée numérique qui le détermine. Moins encore pouvait-il calculer jusqu'à cinq, et quoique appliquant ses mains l'une sur l'autre, il eût pu remarquer que les doigts se répondaient exactement, il était bien loin de songer à leur égalité numérique. Il ne savait pas plus le compte de ses doigts que de ses cheveux et si, après lui avoir fait entendre ce que c'est que nombres, quelqu'un lui eût dit qu'il avait autant de doigts aux pieds qu'aux mains, il eût peut-être été fort surpris, en les comparant, de trouver que cela était vrai.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 71.

(15.) We must not confound Selfishness with Self-love; they are two very distinct Passions both in their Nature and in their Effects. Self-love is a natural Sentiment, which inclines every Animal to look to his own Preservation, and which, guided in Man by Reason and qualified by Pity, is productive of Humanity and Virtue. Selfishness is but a relative and factitious Sentiment, engendered in the Bosom of Society, which inclines every Individual to set a greater Value upon himself than upon any other Man, which inspires Men with all the Mischief they do to each other, and is the true Source of what we call Honour.
     This Position well understood, I say that Selfishness does not exist in our primitive State, in the true State of Nature; for every Man in particular considering himself as the only Spectator who observes him, as the only Being in the Universe which takes any Interest in him, as the only Judge of his own Merit, it is impossible that a Sentiment arising from Comparisons, which he is not in a Condition to make, should spring up in his Mind. For the same Reason, a Man of this kind must be a Stranger to Hatred and Spite, Passions, which the Opinion of our having received some Affront can alone excite; and as it is Contempt or an Intention to injure, and not the Injury itself that constitutes an Affront, Men who don't know how to set a Value upon themselves, or compare themselves one with another, may do each other a great deal of Mischief, as often as they can expect any Advantage by doing it, without ever affronting each other. In a word, Man seldom considering his Fellows in any other Light than he would Animals of another Species, may plunder another Man weaker than himself, or be plundered by another that is stronger, without considering these Acts of Violence otherwise than as natural Events, without the least Emotion of Insolence or Spite, and without any other Passion than Grief at his Ill, or Joy at his good Success.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 15) Il ne faut pas confondre l'amour-propre et l'amour de soi-même; deux passions très différentes par leur nature et par leurs effets. L'amour de soi-même est un sentiment naturel qui porte tout animal à veiller à sa propre conservation et qui, dirigé dans l'homme par la raison et modifié par la pitié, produit l'humanité et la vertu. L'amour-propre n'est qu'un sentiment relatif, factice et né dans la société, qui porte chaque individu à faire plus cas de soi que de tout autre, qui inspire aux hommes tous les maux qu'ils se font mutuellement et qui est la véritable source de l'honneur.
     Ceci bien entendu, je dis que dans notre état primitif, dans le véritable état de nature, l'amour-propre n'existe pas. Car, chaque homme en particulier se regardant lui-même comme le seul spectateur qui l'observe, comme le seul être dans l'univers qui prenne intérêt à lui, comme le seul juge de son propre mérite, il n'est pas possible qu'un sentiment qui prend sa source dans des comparaisons qu'il n'est pas à portée de faire, puisse germer dans son âme; par la même raison cet homme ne saurait avoir ni haine ni désir de vengeance, passions qui ne peuvent naître que de l'opinion de quelque offense reçue; et comme c'est le mépris ou l'intention de nuire et non le mal qui constitue l'offense, des hommes qui ne savent ni s'apprécier ni se comparer peuvent se faire beaucoup de violences mutuelles quand il leur en revient quelque avantage, sans jamais s'offenser réciproquement. En un mot, chaque homme ne voyant guère ses semblables que comme il verrait des animaux d'une autre espèce, peut ravir la proie au plus faible ou céder la sienne au plus fort, sans envisager ces rapines que comme des événements naturels, sans le moindre mouvement d'insolence ou de dépit, et sans autre passion que la douleur ou la joie d'un bon ou mauvais succès.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 117.

(16) It is very remarkable, that for so many Years past that the Europeans have been toiling to make the Savages of different Parts of the World conform to their Manner of living, they have not as yet been able to prevail upon one of them, not even with the Assistance of the Christian Religion; for though our Missionaries sometimes make Christians, they never make civilized Men of them. There is no getting the better of their invincible Reluctance to adopt our Manners and Customs. If these poor Savages are as unhappy as some People would have them, by what inconceivable Depravation of Judgment is it that they so constantly refuse to be governed as we are, or to live happy among us; whereas we read in a thousand Places that Frenchmen and other Europeans have voluntarily taken Refuge, nay, spent their whole Lives among them, without ever being able to quit so strange a kind of Life; and that even very sensible Missionaries have been known to regret with Tears the calm and innocent Days they had spent among those Men we so much despise. Should be observed that they are not knowing enough to judge soundly of their Condition and ours, I must answer, that the Valuation of Happiness is not so much the Business of the Understanding as of the Will. Besides, this Objection may still more forcibly be retorted upon ourselves; for our Ideas are more remote from that Disposition of Mind requisite for us to conceive the Relish, which the Savages find in their Way of Living, than the Ideas of the Savages from those by which they may conceive the Relish we find in ours. In fact, very few Observations to shew them that all our Labours are confined to two Objects, namely the Conveniences of Life and the Esteem of others. But how shall we be able to form to ourselves any Notion of that kind of Pleasure, which a Savage takes in spending his Days alone in the Heart of a Forest, or in Fishing, or in blowing into a wretched Flute without ever being able to fetch a single Note from it, or ever giving himself any Trouble to learn how to make a better Use of it.
     Savages have been often brought to Paris, to London, and to other Places; and no Pains omitted to fill them with high Ideas of our Luxury, our Riches, and all our most useful and curious Arts; yet they were never seen to express more than a stupid Admiration at such Things, without the least Appearance of coveting them. Among other Stories I remember one concerning the Chief of some North-America Indians brought about thirty Years ago to the Court of London. A thousand Things were laid before him, in order to find out what Present would be acceptable to him, without hitting upon any one thing that he seemed to like. Our Arms appeared heavy and inconvenient to him; our Shoes pinched his Feet; our Cloaths incumbered his Body; he would accept of nothing; at length, he was observed to take up a Blanket, and seemed to take great Pleasure in wrapping himself up in it. You must allow, said the Europeans about him, that this, at least, is an useful Piece of Furniture? Yes, answered the Indian, I think it almost as good as the Skin of a Beast. And even this he would not have allowed, had he wore both under a Shower.
     Perhaps I may be told that it is Habit, which, making every Man like best his own Way of Life, hinders the SAvages from perceiving what is good in ours. But upon this Footing it must appear at least very extraordinary, that Habit should have more Power to maintain in Savages a Relish for their Misery, than in Europeans for their Happiness. But to make to this last Objection an Answer which will not admit the least Reply, without speaking of all the young Savages whom no Pains have been able to civilize; particularly the Greenlanders and Icelanders, whom Attempts have been made to rear and educate in Denmark, and who either pined away with Grief ashore, or perished at Sea in attempting to swim back to their own Country; I shall just cite one well attested Example, and leave it to the Discussion of those who so much admire the Police of European State.
     "The Dutch Missionaries with all their Endeavours have not been able to convert a single Hottentot. Van der Stel, Governor of the Cape, having procured a Hottentot Infant, took Care to have him brought up in the Principles of the Christian Religion, and the Manners and Customs of Europe. He cloathed him richly, had him taught several Languages; and the Boy's Progress perfectly corresponded with the Attention bestowed upon it. The Governor, big with Expectations from his Pupil's Capacity, sent him to the Indies with a Commissary-General, who employed him usefully in the Company's Affairs. But, the Commissary dying, returned to the Cape, and in a Visit he made to some of his Hottentot Relations a few Days after his Arrival, took the strange Resolution to exchange all his European Finery for a sheep's Skin. In this new Dress he returned to the Fort, loaded with a Bundle containing the Cloaths he had thrown off, and presenting himself in the following Words: Be so kind, Sir, as to take Notice, that I for ever renounce this Apparel. I likewise for ever renounce the Christian Religion. It is my firm Resolution to live and die in the Religion, Manners and Customs of my Ancestors. All the Favour I ask from you, is to leave me the Collar and the Hanger I wear. I shall keep them for your Sake. These Words were scarce out of his Mouth, when he took to his Heels and was out of Sight; nor did he ever appear among the Europeans again." History of Voyages, T. v. p. 175.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 16) C'est une chose extrêmement remarquable que depuis tant d'années que les Européens se tourmentent pour amener les sauvages des diverses contrées du monde à leur manière de vivre, ils n'aient pas pu encore en gagner un seul, non pas même à la faveur du christianisme; car nos missionnaires en font quelquefois des chrétiens, mais jamais des hommes civilisés. Rien ne peut surmonter l'invincible répugnance qu'ils ont à prendre nos moeurs et vivre à notre manière. Si ces pauvres sauvages sont aussi malheureux qu'on le prétend, par quelle inconcevable dépravation de jugement refusent-ils constamment de se policer à notre imitation ou d'apprendre à vivre heureux parmi nous; tandis qu'on lit en mille endroits que des Français et d'autres Européens se sont réfugiés volontairement parmi ces nations, y ont passé leur vie entière, sans pouvoir plus quitter une si étrange manière de vivre, et qu'on voit même des missionnaires sensés regretter avec attendrissement les jours calmes et innocents qu'ils ont passés chez ces peuples si méprisés? Si l'on répond qu'ils n'ont pas assez de lumières pour juger sainement de leur état et du nôtre, je répliquerai que l'estimation du bonheur est moins l'affaire de la raison que du sentiment. D'ailleurs cette réponse peut se rétorquer contre nous avec plus de force encore; car il y a plus loin de nos idées à la disposition d'esprit où il faudrait être pour concevoir le goût que trouvent les sauvages à leur manière de vivre que des idées des sauvages à celles qui peuvent leur faire concevoir la nôtre. En effet, après quelques observations il leur est aisé de voir que tous nos travaux se dirigent sur deux seuls objets, savoir, pour soi les commodités de la vie, et la considération parmi les autres. Mais le moyen pour nous d'imaginer la sorte de plaisir qu'un sauvage prend à passer sa vie seul au milieu des bois ou à la pêche, ou à souffler dans une mauvaise flûte, sans jamais savoir en tirer un seul ton et sans se soucier de l'apprendre?
     On a plusieurs fois amené des sauvages à Paris, à Londres et dans d'autres villes; on s'est empressé de leur étaler notre luxe, nos richesses et tous nos arts les plus utiles et les plus curieux; tout cela n'a jamais excité chez eux qu'une admiration stupide, sans le moindre mouvement de convoitise. Je me souviens entre autres de l'histoire d'un chef de quelques Américains septentrionaux qu'on mena à la cour d'Angleterre il y a une trentaine d'années. On lui fit passer mille choses devant les yeux pour chercher à lui faire quelque présent qui pût lui plaire, sans qu'on trouvât rien dont il parut se soucier. Nos armes lui semblaient lourdes et incommodes, nos souliers lui blessaient les pieds, nos habits le gênaient, il rebutait tout; enfin on s'aperçut qu'ayant pris une couverture de laine, il semblait prendre plaisir à s'en envelopper les épaules; vous conviendrez, au moins, lui dit-on aussitôt, de l'utilité de ce meuble? Oui, répondit-il, cela me paraît presque aussi bon qu'une peau de bête. Encore n'eût-il pas dit cela s'il eût porté l'une et l'autre à la pluie.
     Peut-être me dira-t-on que c'est l'habitude qui, attachant chacun à sa manière de vivre, empêche les sauvages de sentir ce qu'il y a de bon dans la nôtre. Et sur ce pied-là il doit paraître au moins fort extraordinaire que l'habitude ait plus de force pour maintenir les sauvages dans le goût de leur misère que les Européens dans la jouissance de leur félicité. Mais pour faire à cette dernière objection une réponse à laquelle il n'y ait pas un mot à répliquer, sans alléguer tous les jeunes sauvages qu'on s'est vainement efforcé de civiliser; sans parler des Groenlandais et des habitants de l'Islande, qu'on a tenté d'élever et nourrir en Danemark, et que la tristesse et le désespoir ont tous fait périr, soit de langueur, soit dans la mer où ils avaient tenté de regagner leur pays à la nage; je me contenterai de citer un seul exemple bien attesté, et que je donne à examiner aux admirateurs de la police européenne.
     "Tous les efforts des missionnaires hollandais du cap de Bonne-Espérance n'ont jamais été capables de convertir un seul Hottentot. Van der Stel, gouverneur du Cap, en ayant pris un dès l'enfance, le fit élever dans les principes de la religion chrétienne et dans la pratique des usages de l'Europe. On le vêtit richement, on lui fit apprendre plusieurs langues et ses progrès répondirent fort bien aux soins qu'on prit pour son éducation. Le gouverneur, espérant beaucoup de son esprit, l'envoya aux Indes avec un commissaire général qui l'employa utilement aux affaires de la Compagnie. Il revint au Cap après la mort du commissaire. Peu de jours après son retour, dans une visite qu'il rendit à quelques Hottentots de ses parents, il prit le parti de se dépouiller de sa parure européenne pour se revêtir d'une peau de brebis. Il retourna au fort, dans ce nouvel ajustement, chargé d'un paquet qui contenait ses anciens habits, et les présentant au gouverneur il lui tint ce discours (voy. le frontispice). "Ayez la bonté, monsieur, de faire attention que je renonce pour toujours à cet appareil. Je renonce aussi pour toute ma vie à la religion chrétienne, ma résolution est de vivre et mourir dans la religion, les manières et les usages de mes ancêtres. L'unique grâce que je vous demande est de me laisser le collier et le coutelas que je porte. Je les garderai pour l'amour de vous." Aussitôt, sans attendre la réponse de Van der Stel, il se déroba par la fuite et jamais on ne le revit au Cap." Histoire des Voyages, tome 5, p. 175.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 132.

(17.) [20.] It might be here objected that in such an Uproar and Tumult Men, instead of obstinately butchering each other, would have dispersed, had there not been Bounds set to their Dispersion. But in the first place these Bounds would have been those of the Earth; and if we reflect on the exceeding Population that results from a State of Nature, we shall see that in that State the Earth would in a very short Time have been covered with Men thus forced to keep close to each other. Besides, they would have dispersed, had the Progress of the Evil been any way rapid, or had it been an Alteration wrought from one Day to another. But they brought their Yokes with them into the World; they were in their Infancy too inured by Custom to the Weight of them to feel it ever after. In short, they were already accustomed to a thousand Conveniences which obliged them to stick close to each other, it was not so easy for them to disperse as in early Times, when, as no Man stood in need of any one but himself, every one did what he liked best without waiting for the Consent of any other.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 17) [20.] On pourrait m'objecter que dans un pareil désordre les hommes au lieu de s'entr'égorger opiniâtrement se seraient dispersés, s'il n'y avait point eu de bornes à leur dispersion. Mais premièrement ces bornes eussent au moins été celles du monde, et si l'on pense à l'excessive population qui résulte de l'état de nature, on jugera que la terre dans cet état n'eût pas tardé à être couverte d'hommes ainsi forcés à se tenir rassemblés. D'ailleurs, ils se seraient dispersés, si le mal avait été rapide et que c'eut été un changement fait du jour au lendemain; mais ils naissaient sous le joug; ils avaient l'habitude de le porter quand ils en sentaient la pesanteur, et ils se contentaient d'attendre l'occasion de le secouer. Enfin, déjà accoutumés à mille commodités qui les forçaient à se tenir rassemblés, la dispersion n'était plus si facile que dans les premiers temps où nul n'ayant besoin que de soi-même, chacun prenait son parti sans attendre le consentement d'un autre.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 137.

(18.) Marshal de V*** used to relate, that in one of his Campaigns the excessive Frauds of an Undertaker for Provisions having made the Army suffer and murmur a great deal, he took him roundly to task and threatened him with the Gallows. These Menaces do not concern me, immediately replied the Knave, and I am glad to have this Opportunity of telling you, that 'tis no such easy Matter to hang a Man who can throw away a hundred thousand Crowns. I don't know how it came to pass, ingenuously added the Marshal, but so it happened, that he escaped hanging, though he had deserved it over and over a hundred times.

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 18) Le maréchal de V*** contait que dans une de ses campagnes, les excessives friponneries d'un entrepreneur des vivres ayant fait souffrir et murmurer l'armée, il le tança vertement et le menaça de le faire pendre. Cette menace ne me regarde pas, lui répondit hardiment le fripon, et je suis bien aise de vous dire qu'on ne pend point un homme qui dispose de cent mille écus. Je ne sais comment cela se fit, ajoutait naïvement le maréchal, mais en effet il ne fut point pendu, quoiqu'il eût cent fois mérité de l'être.

Retour au texte

NOTES.
Pag. 168.

(19.) Nay, this rigorous Equality of the State of Nature, though practicable in civil Society, would clash with distributive Justice; and as on the one hand all the Members of the State owe it Services in Proportion to their Talents and Abilities, they should be distinguished on the other in Proportion to the Services which they actually rendered to it. It is in this Sense we must understand a Passage of Isocrates, in which he extols the primitive Athenians for having distingushed which of the two following kinds of Equality was the most useful, that which consists in sharing the same Advantages indifferently among all the Citizens, or that which consists in distributing them to each according to his Merit. These able Politicians, adds the Orator, banishing that unjust Inequality which makes no Difference between the Good and the Bad, inviolably adhered to that which rewards and punishes every Man according to his Merit. But in the first place there never existed a Society so corrupt as to make no Difference between the Good and the Bad; and in those Points concerning Manners, where the Law can prescribe no Measure exact enough to serve as a Rule to Magistrates, it is with the greatest Wisdom that in order not to leave the Fate or the Rank of Citizens at their Discretion, shen forbid them to judge of Persons, and leaves Actions alone to their Discretion. There are no Manners, but such as vie in Purity with those of the old Romans, that can bear Censors, and such a Tribunal amongst us would soon throw every thing into Confusion. It belongs to publick Esteem to make a Difference between good and bad Men; the Magistrate is judge only as to strict Right; whereas the Multitude is the true judge of Manners; an upright and even an intelligent Judge in that Respect; a Judge which may indeed sometimes be imposed upon, but can never be corrupted. The Rank therefore of Citizens ought to be regulated, not according to their personal Merit, for this would be putting it in the Power of Magistrates to make almost an arbitrary Application of the Law, but according to the real Services they render to the State, since these will admit of a more exact Estimation.

F I N I S

Return to Text

NOTES.

(Note 19) La justice distributive s'opposerait même à cette égalité rigoureuse de l'état de nature, quand elle serait praticable dans la société civile; et comme tous les membres de l'Etat lui doivent des services proportionnés à leurs talents et à leurs forces, les citoyens à leur tour doivent être distingués et favorisés à proportion de leurs services. C'est en ce sens qu'il faut entendre un passage d'Isocrate dans lequel il loue les premiers Athéniens d'avoir bien su distinguer quelle était la plus avantageuse des deux sortes d'égalité, dont l'une consiste à faire part des mêmes avantages à tous les citoyens indifféremment, et l'autre à les distribuer selon le mérite de chacun. Ces habiles politiques, ajoute l'orateur, bannissant cette injuste égalité qui ne met aucune différence entre les méchants et les gens de bien, s'attachèrent inviolablement à celle qui récompense et punit chacun selon son mérite. Mais premièrement il n'a jamais existé de société, à quelque degré de corruption qu'elles aient pu parvenir, dans laquelle on ne fît aucune différence des méchants et des gens de bien; et dans les matières de moeurs où la loi ne peut fixer de mesure assez exacte pour servir de règle au magistrat, c'est très sagement que, pour ne pas laisser le sort ou le rang des citoyens à sa discrétion, elle lui interdit le jugement des personnes pour ne lui laisser que celui des actions. Il n'y a que des moeurs aussi pures que celles des anciens Romains qui puissent supporter des censeurs, et des pareils tribunaux auraient bientôt tout bouleversé parmi nous: c'est à l'estime publique à mettre de la différence entre les méchants et les gens de bien; le magistrat n'est juge que du droit rigoureux; mais le peuple est le véritable juge des moeurs; juge intègre et même éclairé sur ce point, qu'on abuse quelquefois, mais qu'on ne corrompt jamais. Les rangs des citoyens doivent donc être réglés, non sur leur mérite personnel, ce qui serait laisser au magistrat le moyen de faire une application presque arbitraire de la loi, mais sur les services réels qu'ils rendent à l'Etat et qui sont susceptibles d'une estimation plus exacte.

Retour au texte

book@petruscamper.com

[ home ] [ reviews ] [ texts ] [ projects ] [ order ] [ sitemap ]
Miriam Claude Meijer, Ph.D. © All Rights Reserved

Valid HTML 4.0!